Yearly Archives: 2014

New Case Study: Engaging ECA Artists with Sustainability

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Following our involvement with the Edinburgh Art Festival’s major exhibition Where do I end and you begin, Creative Carbon Scotland hosted a workshop with students from the Edinburgh College of Art in-situ at the City Art Centre.

Read our latest case study to find out more about-

  • Sustainability engagement methods for practicing artists
  • Sustainability engagement methods for student artists
  • Sustainability workshop implementation methods
  • Visual Arts research projects at large

Further reflections on the workshop can be found on our blog.

The post New Case Study: Engaging ECA Artists with Sustainability appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Creating a List of Climate Change Plays

This post comes from the Artists and Climate Change Blog

The image above shows how 2010 temperatures compare to average temperatures from a baseline period of 1951-1980, as analyzed by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Credit: NASA GISS

Where are the climate change plays and who are the playwrights writing them? We are looking to create a comprehensive go-to list so anyone searching for material related to this issue can have this resource available. Below is what we have found so far. What else is out there?

Please note: This list should by not means be considered an endorsement of the individual plays. It is simply a compilation. Also, in some cases, climate change is featured prominently while in others, it is only a backdrop for the story.

2071 – Duncan MacMillan (UK)
3rd Ring Out – Zoe Svendsen (UK)
AD2050 – Gurpreet Kaur Bhatti (UK)
Arvaarluk: An Inuit Tale – Michael Kusugak (Canada) theatre for young audience
Between Two Waves – Ian Meadows (Australia)
Carla and Lewis – Shonni Enelow (USA)
Earthquakes in London –Mike Bartlett (UK)
Extreme Whether – Karen Malpede (USA)
Far Away – Caryl Churchill (UK)
Field Trip: A Climate Cabaret – Superhero Clubhouse (USA)
Fire In The Garden – Ken Weitzman (USA)
Green Dating – Chantal Bilodeau (Canada/USA) one-act
Greenland – Nicolas Billon (Canada)
Greenland – Moira Buffini, Matt Charman, Penelope Skinner and Jack Thorne (UK)
How to Build a Forest – Lisa D’Amour & Katie Pearl (USA) part visual installation and part theatre performance
If There Is I Haven’t Found It Yet – Nick Payne (UK)
Island – Nicky Singer (UK) theatre for young audience
It Just Stopped – Stephen Sewell (Australia)
Kill Climate Deniers – David Finnigan (Australia)
Mr. Burns – Anne Washburn (USA)
Reclamation – Ken Weitzman (USA)
Red Forest – Belarus Free Theatre (UK)
Sea Sick – Alanna Mitchell (Canada)
Sila – Chantal Bilodeau (Canada/USA)
Ten Billion – Stephen Emmett (UK)
Thaw – Aaluk Edwardson (USA)
The Climate Monologues – Sharon Abreu (USA)
The Contingency Plan – Steve Waters (UK)
The Elephant Piece – Darryl Curry (USA)
The Ice Breaker – David Rambo (USA)
The Great ImmensityThe Civilians (USA)
The Heretic – Richard Bean (UK)
The Last Polar Bears – adaptation by Joe Douglas (Scotland) theatre for young audience
The Weather – Clare Pollard (UK)
The Weather Project – NACL Theatre (USA)
The Word for Snow – Don DeLillo (USA) one-act
This Clement World – Cynthia Hopkins (USA)
Tomorrow Comes Today – Gordon Dahlquist (USA)
Water – created by Filter Theatre & David Farr (UK)
We Turned On the Light – Caryl Churchill (UK) choral work

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Filed under: Theatre

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Edinburgh Green Tease Reflections: Community Growing at North Edinburgh Arts

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Kate began the afternoon’s discussion highlighting the key elements that are integral to the North Edinburgh Arts organisation, addressing the on-going regeneration of the local area and both the challenges and rewards of running the centre in such an unexpected area for an arts hub. The centre’s garden, known as the North Edinburgh Grows project, truly has redefined the function of the entire organisation, emerging as a driving force of participation, engagement and sustainability. Over one third of the garden property has been devolved to other local groups, making both the garden space and the existence of North Edinburgh Arts inherently self-sustaining.

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Designed with support from ANTA Architects, the North Edinburgh Grows project includes play space, gardening plots, quiet spots for reading and a labyrinth path. Current artist-in-residence, Natalie Taylor, joined us for the afternoon’s gathering and explained her role in shaping the garden, both through whimsical visual interventions and by encouraging local involvement. The garden is a place where local children and fresh produce thrive; Natalie is able to encourage the positive regeneration of this space through her artistic and social practice.

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The garden opened in May 2014, offering local children and other community groups the chance to learn how to grow food, engendering themes of self-reliance and responsibility. We had the privilege of being led on a garden tour by three eager local children, and it was clear that the garden is a space that entirely nurtures their imagination. After lending a hand to one of Natalie’s smaller painting projects in the garden, we wrapped up the session with a discussion about the wider role of the arts in urban development. We also explored the availability of spaces for the arts within Edinburgh (prompted by the fact that for many attending it was their first visit to North Edinburgh Arts), and how artists and communities can benefit from socially-driven, and economically accessible creative opportunities.

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The North Edinburgh Grows project is a prime example of how collaboration can give on-going life and energy into a project. Though Kate admits that the organisation will always need management and structure (as well as funding), by injecting energy into a once-overlooked space immediately surrounding the facilities, the organisation will see a flourishing of activity in the years to come. And with the project being shortlisted for a 2014 SURF award, it is clear that the project is gaining well-deserved praise from the Scottish design community.


 North Edinburgh Arts provides opportunities for individual and community development through contact with the professional arts, particularly for residents of Greater Pilton in Edinburgh. To find out more about their work, click here.

Images: Allison Pallenske and Catriona Patterson

 

The post Edinburgh Green Tease Reflections: Community Growing at North Edinburgh Arts appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Bamboo Curtain Studio Creative Talent Programme

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This opportunity comes from Bamboo Curtain Studio

The Bamboo Curtain Studio (BCS) in Taiwan aims to promote cross-cultural exchanges by providing a meeting point for creative talents from national to international art related fields, for short stay or specific projects. BCS also practice and promote sustainability by launching art projects within the community to bring awareness about the environment, global warming and sustainable living.

Since 2009, Bamboo Curtain Studio (BCS) has launched a residency program. It aims to provide time and space for creative talents to do experimental works, outreach projects, collaborations or research. In 2012, we focused more on “Creative Talents”- projects that will bring out new ideas, concepts to the communities, societies and the world, without regard to the age, gender, race and nationality. This program will provide four artists (group) with either a free studio or accommodation space (a choice of only one) for up to two months.

2015 Creative Talent Program

Bamboo Curtain Studio will celebrate its 20th anniversary in the upcoming year of 2015. In celebration of this special occasion, the 2015 “Creative Talents” program specifically opens a call to artists interested in collaborating with our award winning Plum Tree Creek Project, an environmental and community engagement project that focuses on promoting sustainability.

To apply for BCS Creative Talent Program and for more information, please visit the opportunity listing on the BCS website.

Creative Carbon Scotland was fortunate to have Catherine Lee from Bamboo Curtain Studio at our June 2014 Glasgow Green Tease. Catherine spoke about their Plum Tree Creek project at the gathering- reflections from the afternoon are available here.


Image: Bamboo Curtain Studio

 

The post Opportunity: Bamboo Curtain Studio Creative Talent Programme appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Public Art Festival to be simultaneously held with COP 20

Art interventions in public spaces, workshops and a variety of performances intending to generate consciousness about climate change will be simultaneously held with COP 20 set to start on Monday December 1 2014 in Lima, Peru.

Those interventions are part of the “Hot Future” First Public Art Festival. It will display the work of Peruvian and foreign artists and architects, who are committed to counter the climate change problems.

Artists will display their works in Alameda de la Integración (located between The Magic Water Circuit Park and the National Stadium) and in the Cervantes Park.

International guests participating include the Dutch group, Cascoland and Belgian artist, Jozef Wouters.

Peruvian artists participating include: Lucía Monge, Christians Luna, Gabriel Acevedo, Sandra Nakamura, Pablo García and the architects: Ricardo Huanqui, Karen Takano, Ricardo Bocanegra (24/7 Arquitectura studio) and Maya Ballén (Masunostudio).

All these artists will present original proposals like Plantón Móvil by Lucia Monge, which invites people to go out with their plants around the city, expressing their voices in favor of green spaces.

Christians Luna’s project is also featured. It consists in citizen’s involvement in topics regarding climate change, by playing games.

Hot Future will also promote dialogue spaces in order to look for development, consumption and life alternatives to face climate change.

Another attached space will be the Public Vegetable Garden, a platform for the urban agriculture that encourages the growing of vegetable gardens and green roofs in the city. This also generates an opportunity to think about the origins of our food through participating workshops organized by the Universidad Agraria La Molina.

GO LOCAL!!! Oregon County, Missouri

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

This past weekend I drove two hours southeast of Springfield, Missouri to a little town near the border of Arkansas called Alton. In this neck of the woods, everyone remembers when in 1964 the Beatles took a break on the nearbyPigman Farm during their very first American tour. In fact, this year was the 50th anniversary and although the locals have consciously chosen not to turn their town of 879 into a shrine to the Beatles, they did dress up their windows for the anniversary, which was mostly for the town residents, and not to draw tourism.
My reason to visit Alton was by invitation of a very bright and determined, Rachel Reynolds Luster, who was born and raised in the region, and who over the last three years has pulled together the resources, with the help of local producers, to create the Oregon County Food Producers and Artisan Co-op. I found her via Facebook last summer and reached out to learn more about her work as a culture producer and her focus on Ozark Heritage. Through her work I have learned about several rural arts programs that I find so refreshing, artists operating outside the confines of urban art centers. Coming from Northern California where many small towns have been revived over the last decade, I see much potential in the literally thousands of small towns left behind from the early 1980s, when many small farmers went bankrupted.
The Co-op (a membership model), helps support local farmers and artisans by providing a hub for them to sell their goods. Rachel also provides an area for playing music with a piano, a rotating art exhibition, and an education corner or library of local music and written Ozark folklore. She has been collecting stories, and photographs of the regional architecture and even taught me the names of the types of homes you find here (which my grandparents lived in on their farm), flagstone and saddlebag. On Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, you can find her and other community members in the kitchen cooking up lunch for local visitors, “pay what you can,” offering something like what she served me, which was homemade pimento cheese on grilled bread along with pinto beans.
What Rachel has created in Alton could help revive small towns across the Midwest, helping communities that have literally died culturally, and are struggling to survive economically. There is no better cure for social dysfunction than to create a safe place for community members to be themselves, to contribute to their “neighbors” by volunteering to make foods to feed those with less, to make things to sell and barter, and to teach each other our histories and build on these stories to foster the next generation of farmers and makers.
Other rural arts programs and resources to check out include:

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ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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New case studies: Environmental policy and engagement at CCA

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Our most recent digital resources feature the environmental work of the CCA, including strategies and policies that address sustainable changes and positive promotion.

Staff, Tenant and Audience Engagement at CCA discusses CCA’s initiatives for engaging those who use their facilities on a daily basis, as well as occasional visitors to the building. These initiatives include training and incentive schemes, support networks and green transport promotions.

CCA Environmental Policy and Public Statement includes details of the CCA’s high standards of environmental sustainability, with short-term and long-range goals and objectives.

More case studies can be found on our Resources page.


Would you like your organisation featured in our Case Studies? Drop us a line at Gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland.com

The post New case studies: Environmental policy and engagement at CCA appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Opportunity: ASCUS Micro-Residency

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Announcing a new ASCUS micro-residency programme at the Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution (CIIE) located in Ashworth labs, University of Edinburgh.

Scientists have made progress in understanding how pathogens cause disease, escape our immune defences and spread in populations. However pathogen evolution threatens this progress, generating drug resistance, rendering vaccines ineffective and allowing invasion of new hosts and populations.

ASCUS and CIIE labs have teamed up to offer a new opportunity for artists to engage with current scientific research in their unique interdisciplinary centre which brings together specialists in; infection biology, immunology, geneticists, mathematical modelling, epidemiology and evolutionary biology.

For this programme we are offering three artist micro-residencies – each consisting of 14 days contact time between 9th January – 31st March 2015. This opportunity is open to artists in the following disciplines: visual, audio, written/spoken word, theatre, encouraging collaboration not only with the researchers, but also with each other. The artwork created during the micro-residency will be showcased in an exhibition at Summerhall during Edinburgh International Science Festival 2015.

The aim of CIIE micro-residency is to enable true collaborations and enable the production of the most interesting outcomes. For this micro-residency, the artists can respond to the research of the CIIE as a whole, or may choose to focus on one of the identified research (please see additional information for details). We also ask that artists consider that the artwork produced be easily stored, so that it can be re-exhibited for different events.

The fund available for the project is £1,000 per artist with an additional £500 per artist for material costs (all figures quoted are inclusive of VAT)

For more information and to apply, please visit the ASCUS website.

The post Opportunity: ASCUS Micro-Residency appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Upcoming event: Firing Ceramics with a Paper Kiln at Glasgow Green Tease

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Join us on Thursday 27th November, 3 – 5pm as we light up a kiln made of repurposed newspaper to fire the ceramic pieces created at our September Green Tease gathering. The event will take place at an outdoor site off of Garscube Road.

David Parr from Sustainable Glasgow Project will host us on the site which he currently is working with Glasgow City Council to develop into an urban forest and will tell us a bit about the project. Even if you weren’t present at the workshop in September you’re very welcome to come along for a chat and cup of tea next to the fire.

If you were unable to make our last Green Tease with Minty Donald and Nick Millar you can read our reflections here. As always, Green Tease is open to anyone interested in the links between arts and sustainability so please pass this on to anyone you think might like to join us.

Please RSVP to gemma.lawrence@creativecarbonscotland by midday on 26th November.

The post Upcoming event: Firing Ceramics with a Paper Kiln at Glasgow Green Tease appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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