Yearly Archives: 2014

Opportunity: Cove Park Craft Residencies

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This opportunity comes from Cove Park-

In 2015 Cove Park will award a minimum of two Crafts Residencies, of between one to three months each, for individual national and international artists. We will also award one residency, lasting for a minimum of one month to an emerging designer/maker based in Scotland. These residencies will take place during May to September 2015.

Founded in 1999 by Peter and Eileen Jacobs, Cove Park creates year-round residencies across art forms for national and international artists, collaborative groups and organisations. Cove Park is located on an outstanding 50-acre site overlooking Loch Long on Scotland’s west coast (just 60 minutes from Glasgow by road or rail).

Cove Park’s residency programme provides the time and support for artists to focus exclusively upon their own practice. The emphasis is upon research, experimentation and the development of new work. The makers and designers will be part of a changing group of national and international residents specialising in a wide variety of art forms. All of the artists are invited to take part in a series of informal studio presentations, talks, screenings and dinners organised by Cove Park throughout the summer programme. Artists may also have the opportunity to contribute to Cove Park’s public programme. Each artist is provided with a fee and a modest materials allowance.

For more information and to apply, please visit the Cove Park residencies website.

Creative Carbon Scotland offers support for individual makers through our Green Crafts Initiative. The programme is free and open to anyone in the craft sector looking to contribute green actions within Scotland’s cultural industries. For more information and to sign up, please visit our dedicated Green Craft Initiative webpage.


Image courtesy Cove Park

 

The post Opportunity: Cove Park Craft Residencies appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Matthew Mazzotta at Farmers Park

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace
Since moving to the Ozarks, my genetic region of five generations, I have been trying to figure out a way to contribute to the local arts scene. This past summer I received a Call for Artists through the Springfield Regional Arts Council that a local developer, Matt O’Reilly, was looking for proposals to include public art at Farmers Park, his LEED multi-use development with apartments, retail, and a large pavilion where the Farmers Market of the Ozarks has their bi-weekly public market. I contacted Jeff Broekhoven, who coordinated the Call, and who invited me to meet him on-site to walk the property and find out more about the project. I then inquired if they would accept a proposal by an artist from outside of this region in collaboration with myself as an independent curator to meet with people in the community first before making a formal proposal. Broekhoven encouraged me to apply, so I contacted an artist who I have wanted to work with for a few years…. Matthew Mazzotta, a nationally recognized artist from MIT who recently won an American for the Arts Public Art award in recognition of his excellence for a community arts project titled Open House, completed in 2013 in York, Alabama.

Needless to say, our proposal was accepted and on October 15th, 2014 Matthew Mazzotta held one of his unique community arts strategies, an outdoor living room where he posed a series of questions from participants to evoke a sense of place that will inform his proposed work to be build/sited next Spring 2015! Questions he asked included: what are some unknown histories, what is the towns identity, what are the challenges facing the community, and what is something special or something secret about the town…. participants were invited to bring something from their living room, a chair, a table, a lamp, a blanket…. and, their ideas and understanding of their surrounding culture.

The Ozarks in Southwest Missouri is a big mix of religions, ecological biodiversity, musicians, wacky entertainment in nearby Branson, charities, and hide-outs (caves)! After spending five nights at Farmers Park-in-residence, Matthew Mazzotta will spend the next couple months developing his public artwork, which will be presented to the developer Matt O’Reilly at the beginning of the year. We look forward to having Mazzotta back in the Ozarks to visit some of the Mega churches in the area as well as the very progressive international seed company near Mansfield, the Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company, and more farms and caves…. in the near future.

Screenshot 2014-10-15 22.56.48

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ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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British Arts and Science Festivals Association Conference

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This year, the conference takes on the theme of “Access” including access to funding, access to new audiences and access to sustainability. The conference balances social gatherings with debate and discussion events, offering numerous opportunities for professional networking and exchange of ideas. Participants receive discounted tickets to the Canterbury Festival, an international arts and culture festival with a diverse programme of events.

In August 2014, Creative Carbon Scotland hosted a discussion event as part of the Edinburgh summer festivals (highlights can be read here); “Can Festivals Change the World?” featured Di Robson and brought together a group of festival organisers, arts administrators, cultural delegates and creatives to discuss the following questions-

  • What is art’s role in a changing climate?
  • How can artists be part of changing the world for the better?
  • What can festivals do for sustainability?

We hope that this discussion will be continued at the 2014 Bafa Conference for Festivals. For more information, please visit the conference website.

 

The post British Arts and Science Festivals Association Conference appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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OPEN CALL: TREETOPIA

Request for existing digital and .net art for North American environmental advocacy organization.

Deadline November 15, 2014

“Earth laughs in flowers” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

logoWe live in a time when are facing the reality of climate change. Natures aesthetic has gifted us hue dripped falls and white canvas winters. Artists like Ansel Adams and Andy Goldsworthy have captured the graceful growth of our nation’s forests, countrysides and coasts. We are looking for digital works of art that convey a celebratory message around climate change.

Possible subjects could include or be inspired by: people power, environmental justice, wild salmon, orcas, spirit bears, forests, rivers, wild places, climate change, sustainable energy, rejecting extreme fossil fuels, visions of a sustainable future, connection with the earth. Wit and humor are welcome. Interactive artworks highly encouraged. All artwork must present these topics in a positive light.

What we are looking for

ForestEthics is seeking five Internet-based artworks for our end of year fundraising campaign to “Treetopia.” Artworks can be any of the following digital formats: static image (.jpg, png), animation (GIF, Java, HTML5), 15 sec video (mp4). We are asking for a temporary use license from November 15, 2014 – January 15, 2015 unless otherwise agreed to. Artworks will be exhibited in electronic card format as incentives for the audience to financially contribute and donate to ForestEthics and spread awareness about campaign areas including responsible industry, tarsands, Great Bear rainforest, sustainable forest initiatives and oil by rail. Note: artworks will be viewed on multiple devices PC, mobile, tablet, etc.

Compensation

If selected compensation includes a $100 USD stipend for static artworks, $200 USD for animated or video artworks. We offer also offer a donation letter for US based artists, for the remaining value of the license to be used for tax purposes. We will also credit all artworks on distribution materials.

How to submit

Send the following in one email or one website link by November 15, 2014 to danielle@forestethics.org:

Contact info

  • First and Last Name
  • Email
  • Mailing address
  • City, State, Zip
  • Phone
  • Website
  • Bio
  • Description of work or artist statement
  • Title, date, media (format) for each image
  • 1 – 5 images in any of the following formats (.jpg, .png, mp4, website link)

Selected artworks will be decided by November 20, 2014. Artists will be notified by email.

About ForestEthics

ForestEthics.org

ForestEthics protects North America’s last endangered forests and the communities and wildlife that depend on them. Why? Because forests create fresh air and water, nourish and protect wildlife, and help stabilize our climate.

ForestEthics embraces a vision of the forest that benefits all of us — people who live in the forest, people who make their living from forest materials, people who visit the forest, people who count on the clean air and water – and medicines – that forests provide.

When we see a system falling out of line from our vision — Victoria Secret printing their catalogues on paper made from endangered forests or swaths of Boreal forest being cut down to mine Canada’s tar sands — we say something. We do something. We shine a light on the situation, we find working solutions, we don’t stop until it’s fixed.

Questions email: danielle@forestethics.org