Yearly Archives: 2014

Opportunity: Apply to reSOURCE at GSA

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Running from October 2014 to February 2015, reSOURCE seeks applications from 10 students at the Glasgow School of Art and 5 artists/designers/architects from Glasgow’s greater creative community. reSOURCE will be facilitated by members of the GSA Sustainability team and is a process that will assist participants to develop an understanding of the environmental impact of their work.

Through this we hope to stimulate and inspire creative practitioners to become conscious of the carbon footprint associated with, in particular, materials choices. Practitioners are invited to submit a current or future project which could go through the reSOURCE process. This process will involve; the development and use of a materials specific carbon calculator, the documentation of materials used, reSOURCE discussion groups and, a final exhibition of the project which will be funded by ARC.

Participants will receive at stipend of £ 100 for the four month project. In order to receive this funding participants are asked to: submit monthly log tables and carbon calculations, attend the monthly meetings and, to contribute their work with carbon documentation to a final exhibition held in March 2015.


For more information about this opportunity and to apply, please visit the reSOURCE page at the Glasgow School of Art website.

The post Opportunity: Apply to reSOURCE at GSA appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Grant Opportunity from Action Earth

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

CSV’s Action Earth campaign is helping to get people and communities busy outdoors. We have grants to give to groups of volunteers who are carrying out environmental projects in Scotland. The campaign runs until February 2015.

  • Grants from £50 to £250 are available for practical activities that involve volunteers in improving outdoor spaces or creating habitats for wildlife. Grants can be used to purchase plants, tools and materials or to cover volunteer expenses.
  • If your group is volunteering on a Local Nature Reserve we can give you up to £500 for practical work, wildlife recording or educational activities that encourage more people onto the reserve.

If you have any questions contact Robert Henderson at actionearth@csv.org.uk or call 0131 222 9083 / 622 7766.

For more information and to apply online go to: http://actionearth.csv.org.uk

This project is supported by Scottish Natural Heritage

The post Grant Opportunity from Action Earth appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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The Land Institute Prairie Festival 2014

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

Since moving to the Midwest last summer in 2013, I’ve been searching out organizations that are focused on art and agriculture. Upon my arrival, ecological art scholar, Suzaan Boettger in New York City, told me to go to the Prairie Festival, which is an annual gathering, an “intellectual hootenanny,” organized by The Land Institute in Salina, Kansas. Its founder, Wes Jackson, has been inviting global innovators to speak addressing land conservation and food issues for 36 years. Jackson proposed the development of a perennial polyculture in 1978.

Speakers are not allowed to bring slide/powerpoint presentations and are asked to talk to attendees, typically around 1,000, although this year was around 700, with words only. It felt like a Midwest prairie version of a Chatquaqua and at times like a church sermon addressing land issues. In fact, this year, the last weekend of September, Wes invited several speakers to address religion and land ethics, to examine a more spiritual approach to living sustainably on the land/Earth.

Although I was interested in the spiritual aspects of our relationship with the land, I was most impressed with Kristine McDivitt Tompkins and her husband Douglas Tompkins, who together have managed to purchase over two million acres of land in Chile and Argentina and turn it into a National Park. After all these years of attending Bioneers conferences and other ecological restoration gatherings, I had never laid eyes on these two and only heard stories about what they were doing in South America. And, although Kristine was frustrated not to be able to share images of their preservation efforts—parkland—her words were powerful and made me realize that we really need to acknowledge people like these two pioneers who took their hundreds of millions of dollars and did something lasting with it.

Kristine and Douglas who are very competitive by nature, both highly successful business people—she the former CEO of Patagonia and he the former owner of North Face and co-owner of former Esprit—made it their game to give back to the Earth rather than take away from it. The images she wanted to share of the parkland became secondary to the testament of their character, sharing how they decided to do something bigger (or more spiritual?) with what money can buy.

Needless to say, I would highly recommend this event to those who want to experience a more understated like-minded gathering, not a commerical hoopla with booths selling products. The food was amazing, including bread made from Kernza flour from the Institute lands and Saturday night chili, both vegetarian and bison, were so yummy I wanted seconds (but no, they don’t do that). My only complaint!

Each year the Institute features one artist who creates an installation in the adjacent buildings next to the main lecture barn. This year A. Mary Kay who teaches at Bethany College in Kansas was selected. The artist was also recently included in the State of the Art exhibition at Crystal Bridges Museum of Art in Bentonville, Arkansas this fall. More HERE

For more information, go to The Land Institute Prairie Festival 2014!

See you there next year….. Patricia Watts

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ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Open Call: World Conference on Ecological Restoration

This post comes to you from Cultura21

ser2015Proposals are now invited for symposia, workshops and training courses for the 6th World Conference on Ecological Restoration. The deadline for submitting a proposal is Friday 12th December 2014, however early submissions are encouraged and proposals will be considered in the order they are received.  All proposals should be submitted using the online form. Detailed instructions for submitting symposia and workshop proposals are provided below, along with a link to the submission form.  If you would like to submit a proposal for a pre-conference training course, please CLICK HERE.

Symposia

Symposia are held concurrently with the regular sessions of the SER 2015 scientific programme and provide a forum for the exploration and discussion of special topics or themes in the field of ecological restoration and related areas of inquiry.  Organisers can structure a symposium around a series of formal oral presentations or a moderated panel discussion and are expected to focus on new research results, cutting-edge developments and novel ideas as they relate to the social, economic and ecological aspects of restoration.  Symposia should strive for a synthesis of the topic or issue being explored, rather than merely presenting a set of related case studies.  Ideally, symposia are intended to expand cooperation, understanding and interdisciplinary camaraderie in the main thematic areas of the conference.  SER especially welcomes symposia organised by two or more scientists or practitioners from different countries or regions, as well as those that include presenters representing a diversity of backgrounds and sub-disciplines.  All accepted symposia will be allocated one 90 minute time slot during the scientific programme, and in rare cases, may be granted two consecutive slots at the Programme Committee’s discretion.  A symposium should have a minimum of 4 speakers and a maximum of 5 speakers.

Organisers are encouraged to consider publishing the outcomes of their symposia and organisers who can demonstrate a published outcome will be viewed favourably by the Scientific Committee.  It is the organisers’ responsibility to ensure that they liaise with their appointed publisher.

Workshops

Workshops are also held concurrently with regular sessions and symposia but tend to be more interactive and informal in nature and to emphasise discussion and the exchange of information among all participants.  Workshops are most often led by a single organiser/presenter who may simply act as a moderator to guide and facilitate group discussion.  Workshops may be intended to generate analysis around a particular topic or to examine specific technical knowledge, skills or methologies, and in some cases they aim to produce a scientific outcome (eg publication, topical working group, new collaboration or initiative).  As with symposia, workshops will be allocated a 90 minute time slot during the scientific programme (and in rare cases two consecutive slots), and organisers have considerable flexibility to structure this time as they see most productive given their goals and objectives.

1. Evaluation Process and Criteria

The SER2015 Scientific Committee will make the final decision with regard to the acceptance and scheduling of all symposia and workshops.  Proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis and acceptance notices will be sent as soon as possible in order to allow organisers sufficient time to coordinate with speakers, make travel arrangements, seek institutional support and secure sponsorship as necessary.

Proposals will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

  • academic (pure or applied) merit, with emphasis on new research results, cutting-edge developments, novel perspectives and innovative or interdisciplinary approaches
  • submissions should be associated to one of the conference themes; urban, rural or wild (please state which)
  • clear relevance to the field of ecological restoration indicating whether the proposal covers one or more of the scientific, educational, cultural and/or artistic themes (please state which)
  • applicability to ecosystem management practices and/or policy
  • availability of funding to support speaker attendance
  • submission of a clearly written and compelling proposal that includes a draft programme for the symposium, workshop or training course

Organisers will be notified electronically concerning the receipt, review and acceptance of their proposal via the e-mail address provided no later than 23rd January 2015.  If for some reason you do not hear from the secretariat by this date, please contact the secretariat.

2. Organiser Responsibilities

All sessions must have a lead organiser who serves as the primary point of contact.  This person should be readily available by email in the months leading up to the conference and is expected to be present at the symposium or workshop.

It is the responsibility of the lead organiser to communicate information to the individuals participating in their session and to ensure that the participants register.  The Programme Committee reserves the right to rescind the offer of a session in the programme for workshops, training courses or symposia if the speakers are not registered by a specified deadline.

Funding: SER will provide meeting space and onsite logistical support for all symposia and workshops but is not able to offer any travel or accommodation assistance, honoraria, complimentary registration or other funding to session organisers or individual speakers/presenters.  SER encourages prospective organisers to seek sponsorships and/or institutional support to help offset the costs.  Please ensure that information about funding is made clear to all speakers you invite to participate.

If your proposal is accepted: Organisers are responsible for ensuring that all presenters taking part in their symposium or workshop submit an abstract by the deadline (Friday 13th February) via the online form accompanying the Call for Abstracts.  Presenters must also register for the conference before the deadline for presenter registration on 1st June 2015.  Presenters who fail to meet these deadlines may be excluded from the scientific programme.  Symposium and workshop organisers must also submit an abstract as above if they plan to give a presentation during their session and would like their abstract included in the abstract publication.

Symposia organisers are advised that if they are unable to secure enough presenters to fill the symposium or to replace any presenters who cancel, the Scientific Committee may assign an appropriate speaker from the general pool of abstract submissions.  The Committee will make every effort to coordinate with you and obtain your approval in the event that this occurs.

3. Guidelines for Submitting a Proposal

All proposals must be submitted no later than Friday 12th December 2014.  Proposals must be submitted in English using the online submission form provided below.

Please do not submit a proposal if you are not completely sure that you will be able to fulfill your obligation to organise and conduct such an event.

The following information is required; incomplete or inaccurate proposals may not be accepted.

Title: Only capitalize the first word, the word following a colon and all proper nouns and adjectives as shown in the example here.  Italicise Latin species names.

Please avoid the temptation to use ALL CAPITAL LETTERS!

Session Summary: A brief overview of the objective(s), topics to be covered and relevance of the symposium, workshop or training course to practitioners, scientists and/or decision makers in the field of ecological restoration.  The session summary will be reproduced in the conference programme verbatim so please avoid spelling and grammatical errors.

Lead Organiser and Secondary Contact (if applicable)
Note that your name and institutional affiliation will be reproduced in the conference programme as they appear in your proposal.  All communications regarding your proposal, including acceptance notices, will be directed to the email address you provide.

Please avoid the tempation to use ALL CAPITAL LETTERS!

Draft Programme for your Symposium or Workshop
It is important that you provide a draft programme for your symposium, workshop or training course to aid in the evaluation process (and later the planning process).  This programme does not have to be final at the time you submit your proposal and can be modified later.

Symposia: please provide a tentative list of speakers and the titles of their presentations, if available.

Workshops: please provide a brief description of the structure, speakers/presenters and any expected outcomes.

Room set up and equipment requirements
Please let us know if your workshop requires a special room arrangement or equipment other than a dedicated laptop computer, data projector and screen.  It may not be possible to accommodate all requests but the secretariat will advise organisers if there are any constraints.  Please note that all symposia will have a standard room set up.

Sponsorship
Please indicate the availability of funding or in-kind support to cover the costs of organising your symposium, workshop or training course.  As explained above, SER will be unable to provide any financial assistance to help offset the cost of your participation or the participation of any speakers you may invite.

4. Summary of Important Dates and Deadlines

  • 12th September 2014: Call for proposals opens
  • 31st October 2014: Call for abstracts opens
  • 12th December 2014: Call for proposals closes
  • 23rd January 2015: Proposal review process complete (acceptance and rejection notices sent)
  • 13th February 2015: Call for abstracts closes
  • 10th April 2015: Abstract review process complete (acceptance and rejection notices sent)
  • 8th May 2015: Schedule-at-a-glance (with date and time of all sessions) is available
  • 1st June 2015: Presenter registration deadline

5. Cancellation Policy

Please do not submit a proposal if you are not completely sure that you will be able to fulfill your obligation to organise and conduct such an event.  Once a symposium, workshop or training course has been accepted and scheduled, it imposes a serious burden to cancel it and prevents other events from being selected.

If extenuating circumstances force you to cancel your session, we ask that you notify us as soon as possible so that we can reorganise the conference schedule and make alternative arrangements.

6. Online Proposal Submission Form

Please ensure you have read all the information detailed above before progressing to the submission form.  To make a submission, please click here.

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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#GreenFests Top Picks: Scottish International Storytelling Festival

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Bringing performers and spectators from across the world, the theme of the 2014 festival is “Once Upon a Place.” The programme offers many fantastic performances, with a healthy dose of green-tinged activity. The following are Creative Carbon Scotland’s top green picks from the 2014 Scottish International Storytelling Festival programme. The full programme can be viewed here.

Natural Stories, 25 October 2014

“Explore the forms and patterns of living nature through storytelling, felt making and story drama. Introductory story followed by wet-felting and story drama activities, with artist Joanne Baker and storyteller Allison Galbraith. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Please bring an apron, a towel and a plastic bag to take your damp felt home. In association with Lapidus Scotland.”

Mountain Vision: The Landscape Experience, 25 October 2014

“Scotland’s song traditions are intimately connected with “the high hills” and Scotland’s mountainous terrain. Travelling on North America’s Pacific west, in the high sierras, John Muir realised his very Scottish vision of “living with nature”. Musicians and storytellers Geordie MacIntyre and Alison McMorlandrecapture the spirit of mountain vision in its Scottish sources.”

Storytelling for a Greener World, 26 October 2014

“Experience natural stories of all kinds in the beautiful setting of Edinburgh’s botanical gardens. Stories will emerge gently in different locations, while story walks meander between the story encampment and the outer reaches. Also included is a specially commissioned performance of Where Curlews Call by Malcolm Green and Nick Hennesset at 3pm, and an introduction to the ground-breaking Hawthorn Press book, Storytelling for a Greener World.”

From the Pacific Coast, 26 October 2014

“Canadian storyteller Dawne McFarlane shares the rich traditions of Canada’s Pacific coast with stories from land and sea. For many Europeans, including Robert Louis Stevenson, the Pacific journey begins here.”

Between Tides, 27 October 2014

“Tentsmuir is a unique area of North East Fife caught between the tides and endowed with a rich ecology. Lea Taylor, Mairi Campbell and Derek Robertson combine with Scottish natural heritage to capture the flow of nature and the spirit of a special place. This performance follows on from the Place Based Learning workshop.”

 

The post #GreenFests Top Picks: Scottish International Storytelling Festival appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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2014 Fuller Challenge Finalists Announced

This post comes to you from Cultura21

The Buckminster Fuller Institute is pleased to announce the Finalists for the 2014 Fuller Challenge. Now in its 7th cycle, The Fuller Challenge invites designers, architects, activists, entrepreneurs, artists, planners and scientists, from all over the world to submit their game-changing solutions to solve humanity’s most pressing problems. A $100,000 prize is awarded to support the development and implementation of one outstanding strategy.

With the strongest and most diverse pool of entrants to date effecting change in 93 countries across the world, The Fuller Challenge remains the only prize program specifically working to identify, catalyze and celebrate individuals and teams employing a whole systems approach to problem solving. Buckminster Fuller described this approach as comprehensive, anticipatory, design science and was one of the early pioneers of design-thinking that starts with a deep understanding of the “big picture” context, or macro-system, of a problem space.

“We are very proud to track the impact our prize program is having on the international discussion about how to address the big challenges we face. References to holistic, systemic and integrated approaches are everywhere, but it remains difficult to really understand this approach unless you can see it applied in a specific context. This is complex, complicated, long-term work that does not lend itself well to a simple sound bite or elevator pitch. The Fuller Challenge continues to be unique as a showcase for applied whole systems design and the remarkable people at the leading edge of this approach,” said Elizabeth Thompson, BFI’s Executive Director and Co-founder of The Fuller Challenge.

R. Buckminster Fuller defined design as “the effective application of the principles of science to the conscious design of our total environment in order to help make the Earth’s finite resources meet the needs of all humanity without disrupting the ecological processes of the planet.” Each of our seven finalists detailed below applies Fuller’s expansive definition of design. They also embody Fuller’s definition of a design scientist as a synthesis of artist, inventor, mechanic, objective economist and evolutionary strategist.

THE 2014 FULLER CHALLENGE FINALISTS

The seven proposals now under consideration for the prestigious 2014 grand prize of $100,000 have undergone a rigorous, multi-stage review for adherence to the Challenge entry criteria by the members of the Challenge Review Committee including targeted analysis and evaluation by a select group ofexperts and advisors. Detailed information about each project and associated media can be viewed at http://bfi.org/challenge/finalists.

For futher information please contact: challenge [at] bfi [dot] org.

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Edinburgh Green Tease Reflections: Social Sustainability with Out Of The Blue

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This month’s meeting examined more fully how the power of the arts sector can be harnessed to enable social good, improving the lives and environments of individuals and the communities they exist within. There has long been discussion about the positive benefits of cultural participation in the arts: increasing cultural and social capital and improving the communicative links within a society, as well as ensuring economic capital for the sustenance of various livelihoods. Although sustainability is often viewed as synonymous with environmental actions, the traditional three elements of sustainability comprise of environment, economy and society.

Out Of The Blue has been consistently affecting these three elements over its 20 year history, and despite a change in venue 11 years ago.  As a result, it was a particularly appropriate place to provoke a discussion on the role and responsibility of the arts to their surrounds. The event took place in the Cutting Room of the 1901-built, Rowand Anderson-designed Drill Hall: an ex-military building purchased from the Territorial Army and refurbished by the organisation with a strong environmental sustainability ethos.

To start the Green Tease, Rob gave us an overview of Out Of The Blue’s motivations for their community work. He explained how the multi-arts organisation is required to justify their social value to their range of stakeholders in order to secure operational funding and legitimacy. Charity status and activities, contribution to health and education, economic benefits and environmental impact are all considered and addressed by the organisation, and given precedence alongside their initial artistic purpose.

Rob went on to detail a few examples of their initiatives aimed at young people – one of the community groups for whom they aim to be a significant resource – including the Youth Arts Hive and their Community Cafe. ‘The Hive’ builds on Out Of The Blue’s history of engaging young people in participatory cultural activity, partnering with various arts and education organisations as part of Creative Scotland’s Youth Arts Hub/ Time to Shine initiative, whilst the cafe is an on-site skill-training programme for members of the local community.

As the group discussion developed, too did our understanding of what a more socially sustainable arts sector might look like: we explored the impact of permanence (in location and concept) as being distinctly affecting to the success of social projects, but commented on the frequent short term, project-based nature of the arts sector, and how these might be reconciled.  It was suggested that “dipping-in is damaging” when considering social value initiatives, both to the initiative and to the individual unable to witness the outcome of their efforts. We talked about changing the mindset of organisations working in arts sector: how they explain and justify themselves in their immediate area, and what timescales they theorise on when attempting to address inequality, social cohesion and cultural participation. Members of the group also drew from experience working in organisations and artistic venues where staff turnover could prevent successful efforts, suggesting that maintaining continuous knowledge transfer and establishing an educational platform for the transmission of sustainability are paramount to the longevity of ideas and actions.

The two hour discussion also expanded outwith the Edinburgh setting, with members of the group sharing their knowledge, involvement and problems they have encountered when attempting to address sustainability. We learnt of art accessibility projects in rural Finland, where emphasising the affordability of art promotes sustainable livelihoods and increased cultural appreciation and participation. Too, we discussed the repercussions of withdrawing musical support in prisons, and the involvement of cross-medium artists in the research gap surrounding social sustainability.

The evening left the group questioning how the arts can impact across their community and inspired by the work of Out Of The Blue so far!


Our next Edinburgh Green Tease will be announced shortly, be sure to check our News pageFacebook and Twitter for up-to-date information and our Instagram for more event photos. Feel free to post your own Green Tease reflections using #GreenTease.

Image: Alastair Cook: The Land and The Sea at Out Of The Blue Drill Hall, © Chris Donia

 

The post Edinburgh Green Tease Reflections: Social Sustainability with Out Of The Blue appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

Powered by WPeMatico

Water+/-

NPR and WWNO are proud to announce the world premiere of NPR Presents Water +/- on Saturday, October 25, 2014 at 8:00 p.m. ET at the Saenger Theatre. NPR Presents Water +/- combines national and local news coverage, music, poetry, storytelling and visual projections to explore how too much or too little water is shaping lives and affecting communities around the country and the world.

NPR Presents Water +/- brings together Tony-Award winning director Kenny Leon, award-winning NPR Science Correspondent Christopher Joyce, and award-winning theater writers Arthur Yorinks and Carl Hancock Rux with an original sound score by acclaimed violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR). The show starts its eight-city tour in New Orleans. It will be co-hosted by NPR’s Michele Norris and WWNO’s Eve Troeh and will feature Tony Award-winner Anika Noni Rose (Caroline, or Change); Tony Award-nominee, Michele Shay (August Wilson’s Seven Guitars); Jason Dirden (Tony Award-winning Production, A Raisin in the Sun); and Lucas Caleb Rooney (Boardwalk Empire).

“NPR Presents Water + brings together NPR’s journalistic rigor with the artistic and poetic nature of theatrical storytelling, amplifying local stories about water issues that are significant to each region and have a global resonance,” said Indira Etwaroo, executive producer and director of NPR Presents. “We are thrilled to partner with WWNO, who received the Edward R. Murrow Award for their coastal coverage, to create and present the premiere event and to hold it at the historic Saenger Theatre, which reopened after its own dramatic water story post-Hurricane Katrina.”

Tour Dates

  • October 25, 2014, New Orleans in partnership with WWNO
  • November 8, 2014, Weekend in Washington, NPR
  • November 10, 2014, New York, NY in partnership with WNYC
  • November 12, 2014, San Francisco, CA in partnership with KQED
  • November 13, 2014, Seattle, WA in partnership with KUOW
  • November 17, 2014, Atlanta, GA in partnership with WABE
  • November 18, 2014, Cleveland, OH in partnership with Ideastream
  • November 19, 2014, Detroit, MI in partnership with WUOM

“Water is such an important topic, not only for Louisiana, but also for the nation and the world. NPR Presents Water +/- will help to open conversations and the meaningful exchange of ideas in a new way,” said Paul Maassen, WWNO general manager. “We are honored to have the World Premiere here in New Orleans, and for WWNO to play a role in this local and national collaboration among NPR and public radio stations across the nation.”

“I am excited to work with NPR Presents on this meaningful and highly relevant undertaking,” said director Kenny Leon. “Theater has the ability to illuminate the human experience in a way that is unique, vital and authentic. Our goal is to allow Water + to showcase our shared humanity, our shared challenges across the US and the globe.”

Building on NPR and Member Stations’ news coverage, the NPR Presents Water +/- series will highlight each city’s unique, nuanced relationship with water. The scripts are created in partnership with the Member Station combining local sensibilities with national themes. No artistic licenses are taken with the news content; stories are adapted from on-air and online coverage, as well as oral histories, into monologues and dialogues.

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