Yearly Archives: 2014

S.O.S. ACTION Guide is ready for download

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

The recently completed S.O.S. ACTION Guide is ready for download HERE!

This is the second in a series of ten Learning Guides produced by ecoartspace including replicable social practice public art works. Since 2009, Tattfoo Tan has developed S.O.S. to include participation in certification programs for composting, pruning, and community engagement, then expanded on his acquired knowledge to educate others through his mobile and urban garden projects to address food security and sustainability.

The S.O.S. ACTION Guide was developed to accommodate a wide range of participants including nonprofit organizations, school groups, and individuals. It can easily be used for a weekend workshop, an entire semester, or annual project of self- exploration, certifications, and community projects. The guide is considered to be a reproducible tool for anyone interested in taking action addressing issues around sustainability.The guide is FREE, although we ask for your support and feedback as we continue to seek funding to complete the next eight guides including Katie Holten’s Tree Museum, Fallen Fruit’s public fruit mapping, and more! Please make a donation to ecoartspace HERE.

Guide Authors:
Patricia Watts, Lead Author
Tattfoo Tan, S.O.S. Artist
Ian Garrett, Sustainability section
Chris Fremantle, Food Security section
Christopher Kennedy, Action Steps, Supplemental Activities and Core Standards Alignment
Special thanks to Melanie Franklin Cohen, Staten Island Arts
Supported in part by individual donors from the S.O.S. Indiegogo campaign
http://ecoartspaceactionguides.blogspot.com/

Click on the S.O.S. ACTION GUIDE image above to go to the ecoartspace ACTION Guide webpage where you can also download our first guide, the HighWaterLine guide.

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ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Cologne – Tag des Guten Lebens “Day of the Good Life”

This post comes to you from Cultura21

This Sunday, the streets of Cologne-Ehrenfeld will belong only to its residents. Without traffic and lots of free space for encounters and action. “Tell everyone, talk to your neighbours, this day will be what we make of it and if all of us participate!” There will be no cars in the district of Cologne-Ehrenfeld, instead there will be room for initiatives, creative workshops and encounters in search and promotion of alternatives for a more sustainable, more communal an caring lifestyle.

Exhibitions, readings and theatre plays will take place outside, there will be food and drinks available though not in the usual commercial fashion.

When: Sun, Aug. 31st, 2014. From 11am to 8pm.

Where: Car-free area between Vogelsangerstr. and Subbelrather Straße and Gürtel and Innerer Kanalstraße

More Infohttp://www.tagdesgutenlebens.de

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Cultura21 eBook Vol. 12: A Journey Through Alternative Ways of Living:

This post comes to you from Cultura21

a design approach for scaling up grassroots movements towards sustainability
12th volume in the Cultura21 eBooks series on culture and sustainability – by Nicholas Torretta

Given the growing world-wide urbanization and the need for achieving a sustainable way of living, there is an urgent need for developing possibilities sustainable ways of urban living. This study was carried to find the existing urban sustainable practices and to propose connections and complementarity between them. For this, this study was based on emerging design practices to foster and disseminate the practices to a wider public, which resulted on the creation of the »Guidebook for Urban Freedom«.

Click here to download the eBook for free in PDF format.

Reminder: The Cultura21 eBooks are also available for purchase at a very small price, in a genuine Kindle ebook version, on the Amazon Kindle websites worldwide. Just search for “Cultura21″ on your Kindle shop to find our ebooks… (This 12th volume will be released in Kindle eBook version in a few weeks.)

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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#GreenFests tips: 2014 Edinburgh Mela

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The Edinburgh Mela celebrates its 20th birthday this year! Join in the fun this weekend at Leith Links, 30-31 August from noon-9pm. Here are Creative Carbon Scotland’s tips for enjoying everything green at the festival.

Walk or cycle

The Edinburgh Mela boasts extensive cycle parking, and even a mechanic (provided by the City of Edinburgh Council) to give bikes a “once over” free of charge! The festival is located within a short cycling distance from the city centre, estimated times can be found on the Mela website here. The website also includes information about desirable walking routes to the Leith Links.

Enjoy the Global Food Village

In 2013, the Edinburgh Mela set progressive packaging regulations for their Global Food Village; non-compostable packaging has been banned since then, but with Vegware as a partner the Global Food Village is still a roaring success.

Wee Green Cinema

Global cinema advocates Take One Action are at the Edinburgh Mela this year with their Wee Green Cinema, a pop-up cinema powered by solar energy and cycles. The Wee Green Cinema will screen feature films in the evenings, along with daytime activities, animations and even an exclusive UK film premiere!

Social sustainability

Not only does the Edinburgh Mela promote environmental sustainability, but the festival also celebrates cultural diversity and inclusivity. Edinburgh Mela Director Chris Purnell describes the range of cultures at this year’s festival as going “beyond its beginnings as a celebration of the city’s Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities.” This year’s programme includes music, dance, fashion, film and food from all corners of the globe.


Image courtesy David P Scott and Edinburgh Mela. 

The post #GreenFests tips: 2014 Edinburgh Mela appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Teresa Posyniak’s Beautiful Losers

This post comes from the Artists and Climate Change Blog

Featured Image: The Deeps Tapestry VI. 3′ x 2′, paper on cradled wood stretchers, wax and mixed media.

Teresa Posyniak is a painter and sculptor best known for her work with encaustic, using hot beeswax to create rich, sensual surfaces that incorporate textures, drippings, splatters and layers of tinted, glowing colors. She is also an artist exploring climate change issues in Calgary, Alberta – a city that boast over 100 energy companies, mostly in the oil and gas industry. One of the fasted growing economy in Canada, with the tar sands literally in its backyard, Calgary does not play well with those who criticize its economy’s main driver. Yet artists still find a way to make their voices heard.

Note: The photos included in this post are studio shots of works in progress that will become part of Beautiful Losers: My Carbon Sink Muses. Each photo is a detail of a much larger installation. There will be at least 9 columns in total. Tree forms will number about a dozen. Bleached Forest will be one much larger piece with many more elements.

You’ve provided this blog with a few details of works in progress for your series Beautiful Losers: My Carbon Sink Muses. Can you describe these paintings, sculptures and installations?

In this series, I explore the beauty and function of plankton, the smallest photo-synthesizer and supplier of half the earth’s oxygen, and trees, the largest, through paintings, sculpture and installations. Fascinated by the ornate shells and lace-like appearance of plankton and the striations and other marks on trees, I’ve created many paintings of these subjects individually (see Inhale and Birch Poems series). More recently, I’ve begun combining these subjects to create new forms. The plankton paintings are shaped irregularly, like pieces of a large puzzle, and the sculptural elements are evolving into installations which are designed to adapt to myriad gallery spaces. The materials I use vary widely: painting media, canvas, paper, cast paper and concrete, wax, felt, wood, lace and industrial steel connectors. Once completed, I hope to exhibit this work in a public gallery in the near future.

Creature Columns: 8' x 18", cast paper over sono tube, cast concrete base, lace, wax, oil.  Creature Columns: 8′ x 18″, cast paper over sono tube, cast concrete base, lace, wax, oil.

How does an artist dealing with climate change survive in the heart of Canada’s oil country? Does the proximity of the tar sands influence how you approach your work?

I can’t help but approach the issue of climate change with some trepidation because many of my friends, family, neighbours, acquaintances, collectors and clients work in the oil industry or business related to oil. As a social activist, I’m aware that many of the social justice organizations and charities I’ve supported have been funded by the oil and gas companies. Like most of us anywhere in the world, I am dependent on oil and gas for my energy needs. In Alberta and Canada, oil is a key driver in our economy. But, as I like to point out, it doesn’t mean we can’t question it or lobby for alternatives to this non-renewable resource.

I’ve had many private studio viewings of this series in progress and had several images published in the 2012 Paris exhibition Carbon 12. Reactions vary wildly from fascination, curiousity, appreciation for the aesthetics of the works but doubt about my stance on climate change, defensiveness and occasionally open hostility towards the perceived “attack” on oil. Because I’m not a scientist but an artist who loves science in general and reads voraciously about climate change, I always emphasize the importance of paying attention to the science. When I do have an exhibition, I’ll definitely promote the invitation of scientists and others to lecture on this subject.

You mentioned being inspired by the work of science journalist Alanna Mitchell [featured in a previous blogpost] for your Inhale and Beautiful Losers series. Can you talk a little bit about this?

Alanna Mitchell, my close friend since the late 70’s, introduced me to plankton about 8 years ago while she was researching and writing Seasick: The Hidden Ecological Crisis of the Global Ocean. Our frequent conversations about her experiences with ocean scientists on their expeditions inspired me to look deeply into the function of plankton and the effects of ocean acidification as a result of increasing carbon emissions. About 3 years ago when Alanna walked into my studio, she pointed out that I was working on both the largest absorber of carbon emissions, trees, and the tiniest, plankton. Prior to that, I considered trees (a long-time subject) and plankton as separate series in spite of their common function. Alanna’s observations inspired me to integrate these distinctive forms ever since, leading me back into sculpture and installations after many years of painting. Her influence on the direction of my work and ideas has been no less than profound.

Tree Form I:  5' x 2', felt, paper, wax, oil, lace, wood. Tree Form I: 5′ x 2′, felt, paper, wax, oil, lace, wood.

Beautiful Losers: My Carbon Sink Muses is a convergence of interests (trees and plankton) and disciplines (painting and sculpture). Do you feel this intersectional quality speaks to the nature of climate change in some way?

It feels very natural for me to explore the imagery of trees and plankton through painting and sculpture, both major disciplines in my art education and studio practice over 35 years. Blending art with reality has always been a major focus of mine as well, and when a work strikes a nerve with the public, it’s a hugely rich experience. In 1991 I built Lest We Forget: A Memorial to 135 Canadian Murdered Women which was later permanently installed in the University of Calgary’s Law School in 1994. It was one of Canada’s first such memorials and a catalyst even now for more discussion and action to address domestic violence. It now seems fitting that the cast paper and concrete columns I used in that sculpture are now being resurrected for Beautiful Losers where they are covered in lace and wax, appearing like strange trees crawling with plankton. The hugely all-encompassing nature of climate change lends itself to the convergence of ideas, imagery and the creation of new forms.

What gives you hope?

Without hope, we lack the motivation to discover solutions to this crisis that we face. Individual initiatives give me hope. Major climate change deniers and others that refuse to acknowledge the crisis make me lose hope. Unless governments provide leadership to impose controls on carbon emissions and the coal, oil and gas industries, what real impact do our efforts to recycle, use public transit, limit our energy consumption have?   Hope is life-affirming, the only way forward.

The Deeps Tapestry VII. 3' x 2', paper on cradled wood stretchers, wax and mixed media.The Deeps Tapestry VII.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to the Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Content of Nothing :: Part 5 :: On Wonder

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Featured Image: Olafur Eliasson: Your Natural Denudation Inverted Carnegie International 1999 Pittsburgh. Image reproduced from Olafur Eliasson, Phaidon Books (2002)

Judy Spark: Olafur Eliasson’s work seems built around this notion of a ‘gap’ as we catch ourselves in the shift between responding to what it seems we are faced with and our recognition of this response. Although I have only ever seen it in books, I love this piece; it resembles some sort of natural geyser – it reminds me of an exquisite Hokusai landscape but it’s constructed around the flue outlet of the Museum’s heating system. You’d said that the ‘spectacle’ of his work had sometimes made you uncomfortable, and indeed, I appreciate what you mean by this, but I’ve been persisting recently with trying to unearth a bit more about what he does. The work plays on our tendency to ‘name’ things as we momentarily encounter the thing we are viewing as ‘real’. For me, it’s as if this thing of the spectacle; the technological sublimity he creates, ends up coming back on itself to ‘the things themselves’; as we remember that what we are seeing is an artwork, a ‘construction’ and not a ‘real’ thing, we are made to reflect on why we were not at first moved by the original – had forgotten how to see it. His work does seem to effect a shift in perception of our natural surroundings. Perhaps his intentions may turn out to be a little less ‘worthy’ than that but we are being invited to make what we make of it (every title has ‘Your’ at the beginning) or at least encouraged to recognise that this is what we are doing. It almost hurts that we might, for instance, have lain basking in wonder in Tate Modern (beneath the Weather Project) when we have forgotten how to be fully aware of the full implications of the sun itself! Eliasson’s relationship to phenomenology is well evidenced, specifically in the work of writer Daniel Birnbaum. As I see it, Eliasson’s work creates a ‘gap’, a space for wonder. I think a lot about this potential of the artwork as a space for wonder.

Samantha Clark: Yes, wonder as a momentary suspension of discursive thought, a pause or space we can enter. Wonder comes in for criticism, seen as a privilege of the leisured classes wandering awestruck around the mountains while local people are just busy getting on with their work, or as some kind of brainless, slack-jawed paralysis. It’s been used that way historically, by the Church for example, to suppress curious and possibly heretical questioning. But I’m interested in some of the ethical arguments for wonder and enchantment presented by the likes of Suzi Gablik and Jane Bennett, Ronald Hepburn too. What a poem, or an artwork, or a piece of music can convey, is that sense of suspension, sharing a moment of wonder that comes like an unexpected gift, a moment with a particular weight to it, that leaves us in a slightly different shape. Bennett argues that this enchantment brings a gratitude and generosity to our ethical relations, that isn’t about obligation or duty, but about love. Art works can open that space up for us. And I think that ideas can do that too. So I don’t draw a line between academic and creative work in that regard.

Bennett argues that ‘wonder is not a naive escape from politics but marks the vitality and agency of a world that sometimes bestows the gift of joy to humans, a gift that can be translated into ethical generosity’ (2001: 175). It’s not about going about in a constant dwam, but about those moments of wonder that punctuate the everyday. She equates wonder with love for the world, a love that engenders care. Like Hepburn, she thinks we should cultivate the capacity for wonder, and embrace those moments of enchantment which act as a ‘shot in the arm, a fleeting return to childlike excitement about life’ (5). Bennett suggests that the delight and joy of wonder spills its good humour over into our ethical life, to nourish an ethics based on love for the world rather than on duty and obligation, ‘rendering its judgments more generous and its claims less dogmatic’ (10). Hepburn sees an affinity between the non-exploitative, non-utilitarian attitude of wonder and ‘attitudes that seek to affirm and respect other-being’ (1984: 145). Wonder keeps our attention in and on things in the world, poignantly realising their potentiality and fragility. The attitude of wonder is one which, Hepburn thinks, readily gives rise to compassion. ‘From a wondering recognition of forms of value proper to other beings,’ he suggests, ‘and a refusal to see them simply in terms of one’s own utility-purposes, there is only a short step to humility.’ (1984: 146)
References:

Grynsztejn, M.; Birnbaum, D.; Speaks, M. (2002) Olafur Eliasson, London: Phaidon Press Ltd

Gablick, S. (1993) The Re-enchantment of Art, London: Thames and Hudson

Bennett, J. (2001) The Enchantment of Modern Life: Attachments, Crossings and Ethics, Princeton: Princeton University Press

Hepburn, R. (1984) Wonder and Other Essays: Eight Studies in Aesthetics and Neighboring Fields, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.

Go to EcoArtScotland

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Upcoming Events: Himalayan Centre for Arts & Culture Autumn Programme

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

The Himalayan Centre for Arts and Culture has recently released their Autumn 2014 programme, which includes a variety of workshops supporting all aspects of green living.

image001image002

For more information, please contact harriet@himalayancentre.org


 

Image courtesy Himalayan Centre Edinburgh.

 

 

The post Upcoming Events: Himalayan Centre for Arts & Culture Autumn Programme appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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#GreenFests highlights: Tumadh | Immersion Dalziel+Scullion at Dovecot Studios

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

As the title may suggest, Tumadh | Immersion (“tumadh” is the Gaelic word for “immersion”) explores themes and perspectives of bodily experiences within the natural landscape. Dalziel+Scullion’s most recent exhibition is located partially at Dovecot Studios in Edinburgh and partially at An Lanntair Gallery in Stornoway; the works presented in the exhibition embrace relational complexities within and amongst themselves.

At the Dovecot Studio portion of Tumadh | Immersion, the artists show a series of five garments alongside video, sculptural and digital image works. A video guide illustrates the functionalities of the garments; viewers can imagine the possibilities created by wearing the works within the landscape. Posing a juxtaposition of the tailored traditional forms constructed with Harris Tweed and the outdoor apparel often worn in the landscape from which the fabric receives its inspiration, the garment series described by artist Louise Scullion as a “family” effectively embody the common urges we feel when leaving the structure of urban dwelling for a more wild existence.

Outdoor apparel is traditionally meant to keep the wearer as dry, warm and generally isolated from the conditions of their surroundings as possible; this convention is challenged through some of the counter-intuitive features of the garments’ designs. The Rain outfit, with a sort of anti-hood, exposes the wearer’s head while keeping neck and shoulders dry with a rubber outer shell. Artist Matthew Dalziel mentioned the difference in our relationship with the weather in rural and urban areas. He pointed out that in cities we’re used to abiding to certain habits and usually attempt to avoid the rain. In rural locations these social rules seem to dissipate.

The artists mentioned that a major catalyst for the project was a statistic released last year; globally, more people now live in cities than in rural areas. The garments respond to this by prompting their users to re-engage with particular aspects of the natural environment that are often cast aside or limited in tangible experience by conventions of being “equipped” for outdoor recreation.

North Gallery at Dovecot Studios. Image by Michael Wolchover.North Gallery at Dovecot Studios. Image by Michael Wolchover.

A profound point made by Louise was that the artists are interested in asking how we can design our lives to embrace climate change more positively. This resonates with the previous Dalziel+Scullion work, Rain (Wales), that saw the creation of a temporary pavilion in the rainiest part of Wales, which was built with a tin roof to encourage participants to revel in the sound of the rain falling above their heads. The artists emphasized their interest in how they can extend this ethos to other objects and architecture; could bus shelters be built in a similar way?

Another work in the exhibition is Recumbent, which is a tweed jacket with a padded hood and back. The padding invites the wearer to lie down in forests or next to rivers to watch and listen to the world around them. Louise described this as a continuation of their previous work Rosnes Benches (“rosnes” spells senses backwards). These benches are installed in various woodlands within the Dumfries and Galloway region. The artists described these benches as “sockets” which allow their user to “tune into the frequencies of their surroundings” and encourage a slowing down of pace. Matthew emphasized that a common strand through all of these works is the permission given to people to do certain things that they otherwise might not.

The North Gallery of Dovecot Studios contains work of nearly an entirely different experience, recreating atmospheric notions of a natural landscape. The choreographic interchange between the two gallery spaces enhances the tension between comfortably experiencing the natural world and finding yourself overcome by its forces. Tumadh | Immersion challenges our gravitation towards the comfortable experience, offering the promise that a different method of immersion may be more authentic.


Tumadh|Immersion runs at Dovecot Studios from  1 August-13 September 2014 and at An Lanntair from 5 July-30 August 2014.

Photo by Michael Wolchover, courtesy Dovecot Studios.

The post #GreenFests highlights: Tumadh | Immersion Dalziel+Scullion at Dovecot Studios appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Open Call For Festival Commission Development

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Environmental Art Festival Scotland (EAFS) 2015 – OPEN CALL

What: To develop three major commissions for Environmental Art Festival Scotland 2015
Who: Artists (all disciplines), architects, designers, makers, creative producers, arts organisations, activists or collaborative groups

The EAFS team is beginning the process of developing work for the 2015 festival. To do this we want to work collaboratively with creative people and communities of interest based locally, nationally or internationally.

The commissioned artworks might comprise a journey, an event, an installation, an art happening. They might involve structure, visual art, design, architecture, sound and performance or a combination of these disciplines. We are interested in work that involves making across different disciplines and technologies and ideas of sharing and potentially leaving something behind. The artwork should culminate in Dumfries and Galloway as part of EAFS 2015 (28 – 30 August).

Festival Themes

• Inventiveness, foolishness and generosity as a way of understanding the world
• Food, clothes, shelter and environmental sustainability
• Hospitality, hosting and community
• Journeys, migrations, secular pilgrimage and transformation

Environmental Art Festival Scotland
EAFS will develop, create and support experiences that allow direct engagement with place and land through the arts. EAFS will encourage future thinking and practical action about new ways of living.

Environmental Art Festival Scotland (EAFS) is a biennial arts festival in Dumfries and Galloway, South West Scotland. The inaugural EAFS happened in late summer 2013 and was produced by three leading arts organisations working in partnership: Wide Open, Spring Fling and The Stove Network.

Apply: http://www.environmentalartfestivalscotland.com/eafs-2015/ 
Deadline: 5pm Friday 19 September 2014

Location: Dumfries and Galloway

For further information, please contact info@environmentalartfestivalscotland.com (Leah Black, Matt Baker, Jan Hogarth), or call 01387 213 218, or visit http://www.environmentalartfestivalscotland.com/eafs-2015/

The deadline is Friday 19 September 2014 at 17:00.

The post Open Call For Festival Commission Development appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Freelance Project Coordinator

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This opportunity comes from the Himalayan Centre for Arts and Culture-

Freelance Project Coordinator for 4 month Climate Change Project

The Himalayan Centre’s ‘Leith Community Climate Change Project’ is looking for someone to coordinate weekly discussion sessions to support people in Leith to reduce their carbon footprints. The sessions will take place once a week, for 3/4 months covering a different topic each week.  They will explore the complexities of moving towards a more sustainable, low-carbon society and will help the Leith Community Climate Change project deliver real change and complement other energy efficiency initiatives.

The sessions will offer:

•    Space for people to explore what climate change means for themselves, their families and their aspirations

•    Time to work through the conflicts between intention, social pressure and identity

•    Reliable, well-researched information and practical guidance on what will make a difference

•    Support in creating a personal plan for change

The sessions will use professionally designed, reliable materials to cover climate change basics, ideas for a low-carbon future and the four key areas of the footprint – home energy, travel, food and other consumption. Discussions of practicalities are woven together with discussions of how people feel and what these changes mean personally.

Role description: 

The Coordinator will complete a three day facilitator training course in order to understand the desired format for the conversation sessions and use the resources created for them.

Tasks:

– Promote the project to different networks.

– Recruit participants for the weekly sessions.

– Coordinate and run the sessions alongside an experienced facilitator.

–   Work with the Engagement Officer to ensure the sessions support and complement the overall project aims.

–   Monitor the impact of the project.

Skills required: 

– Excellent communication skills.

– Sound knowledge of climate change.

– Experience of working with people of different ages, backgrounds and cultures.

– Project Management Experience.

– Able to use own initiative.

Training:

The successful candidate must be available to complete 3 days training on the 19th 20th and 21st September in Edinburgh, or the 10th, 11th and 12th October in Lincoln.

Details

Hours: 14 hrs per week to be agreed with successful candidate.

Fee:  £4000

Start date: October 6th 2014

End date: February 27th 2015

If you are interested, please send a CV and covering letter to harriet@himalayancentre.org by Monday September 8th 5pm.

Interviews will take place Monday September 15th.

If you would like more information please call Harriet on 07949740030

The post Opportunity: Freelance Project Coordinator appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

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