Yearly Archives: 2014

Opportunity: Festival Project Manager, EAFS

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

We are looking for a Festival Project Manager: Environmental Art Festival Scotland 2015

Background

Environmental Art Festival Scotland (EAFS) is a biennial arts festival in Dumfries and Galloway, South West Scotland. The inaugural EAFS happened in late summer 2013 and was produced by three leading arts organisations working in partnership: Wide OpenSpring Fling and The Stove Network. Key to the success of EAFS is collaborative and cross-disciplinary working. The EAFS team in 2013 worked with local, national and international artists, designers, producers and local communities to commission, curate, fund, co-fund and produce over 30 installations, exhibitions, talks, workshops around the themes of land, environment, and sustainability. EAFS has grown out of a long-term ambition for Dumfries & Galloway to become the international home for environmental art building on the pedigree and projects and artists connected to the region such as Andy Goldsworthy’s Striding Arches, Charles Jenck’s Garden of Cosmic Speculation and Dalziel and Scullion’s Rosnes Bench. EAFS 2015 will happen in a location in Dumfries and Galloway over 28, 29, 30 August.

About the Post

The Festival Project Manager will play an integral role in the success and development of the 2015 festival. We are looking for someone with both experience and passion – experience of arts project management, festival and events, fundraising and a passion for environmental art, design and sustainability. The initial appointment is part-time for a seven-month period, however the intention is that this will develop into a 4 (or more) days a week position between March – September 2015 with potential for this to continue beyond EAFS 2015 (subject to funding and performance of the successful candidate). This is a new post and the successful candidate will be responsible for developing and shaping the role and funding for the post in line with the ambitions of the festival and the team.

Terms

Employment will be on a self-employed basis for seven-months (with a review at three-months). It is anticipated the approximate time required initially will be 2 days per week between September 2014 – January 2015 and 3 days per week between Februarys – March 2015. This will be extended and increased through fundraising, which will happen between September 2014 and January 2015.

Fee

£5580 (62 days @ £90 per day between September 2014 and March 2015: approximately 8 days a month September – January and 12 days per month February and March 2015)

How to Apply & Interview Process

  1. Covering letter, CV, two referees to be sent to info@environmentalartfestivalscotland.com (FAO Leah Black)
  2. Application deadline 5pm on 15th August 2014
  3. Interviews will happen in Dumfries on Thursday 21st August (shortlisted applicants will be notified of their interview time by 5pm Monday 18th August)
  4. Start date w/b Monday 8th September 2014

Download the full job description: Festival Project Manager EAFS – Final

Please get in touch with Leah Black (Director, Spring Fling and Co-producer, EAFS) with any questions on info@environmentalartfestivalscotland.com or 01387 213 218

The post Opportunity: Festival Project Manager, EAFS appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: Call for photographer

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland creative_carbon_scotlandCreative Carbon Scotland is looking for one photographer to attend and document the Fringe Re-use and Recycle Days during the 2014 Edinburgh Festival Fringe. The event, held in collaboration with the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, is an opportunity for participating Fringe companies and productions to bring their used set and production materials to swap or offer to other companies and productions. The Re-use and Recycle Days are widely successful and a wonderful opportunity for Fringe participants. This year, we would like to document the items being brought to Fringe Central for the Re-use and Recycle Days via the use of a timelapse photography series. We are hoping to capture images from each day to create either a .gif or timelapse movie of the accumulation of items in the space. As the photographer, you will be responsible for the creation of the timelapse movie, .gif and stills. All work will be credited to the photographer and will appear on the Creative Carbon Scotland website. This one-off opportunity requires the following-

  • You MUST be able to attend both Re-use and Recycle Days in their entirety (25 August and 26 August from 11am to 4pm, with a 30 minute lunch break)
  • You must have your own camera equipment and tripod
  • You must be able to send us the photos digitally by 12noon, 28 August 2014. File format to be determined.

Fee: £250 (for the two days work and editing time) + travel costs within Edinburgh


For more information and to apply, please send your contact information and CV to Allison Palenske at Allison.palenske@creativecarbonscotland.com The post Opportunity: Call for photographer appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland. ———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century. In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably. We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts. Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through: Changing their own behaviour; Communicating with their audiences; Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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SOS – Save Our Spaces at #edfringe

This show is part of the Fringe Sustainable Practice Award Shortlist – celebrating the greenest and most sustainable shows at the Fringe.

sos-save-our-spaces_2014SOSSAVF_JGSOS is a new musical comedy about a local community trying to save their town. Based on true events, it tells the mad story of one local area housing committee. Six eccentric characters gather to save their village green from the town planners. Is their community lost? Will politics or the common people win the day? An exciting 45 minute piece of new writing featuring live music, gags, mayhem and all kinds of fun and antics.

For more information or to purchase tickets click HERE. 

The Handlebards at #edfringe

This show is part of the Fringe Sustainable Practice Award Shortlist – celebrating the greenest and most sustainable shows at the Fringe.

handlebards-macbeth_2014HANDLEC_AHF“Four actors, four bicycles, 40 characters and a 2,000 mile adventure. The HandleBards – a madcap, all-male troupe of travelling players – are cycling to the Fringe from London on a UK tour. On just four bicycles they will carry all the necessary set, props, costumes and camping equipm
ent to perform two of Shakespeare’s greatest plays, Macbeth and The Comedy of Errors, at the beautiful Botanic Gardens. It’s Shakespeare done differently, an all-male, bike-powered, open-air, wild 1930s indie-folk romp.”

For more information on The Handlebards visit Peculius or to purchase tickets click HERE (Macbeth) or HERE (Comedy of Errors).

#GreenFests Highlights of John Muir: Rhapsody in Green

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

This past Thursday, Creative Carbon Scotland attended a performance of  John Muir: Rhapsody in Green, a one-man production starring actor Mike Maran. Our blogger-in-residence, Allison Palenske, reflects on the highlights of the performance, which has been shortlisted for the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award.

John Muir: Rhapsody in Green took place at Valvona and Crolla (a refuge for Italian foodies in Edinburgh) tucked away in a cosy backroom space in the rear of the shop. The intimacy of the space allowed for a comfortable sharing of narratives from the life of John Muir, Scottish-born conservationist best known for his pioneering work in California and Alaska. In the production, Mike Maran adopted the character of Reverend Samuel Hall Young, a young missionary who met Muir during their shared time at Fort Wrangell in Alaska.

Early in the performance Maran asserted, “There’s a moment when someone comes into your life and nothing can be the same again.” For Reverend Samuel Hall Young, this moment was when he met Muir. John Muir: Rhapsody in Green traces the Reverend’s experiences with Muir through a series of anecdotal recollections of their time in a wild and raw nineteenth-century Alaska. Alaska had just been purchased by the United States at this time, and little was known about this “last frontier” for America.

Muir’s fascination with Alaska initially came from the glaciers present in the region. He arrived to the territory with the urge to learn about glaciation (a process that is very relevant to the Scottish landscape as well) and the entire interconnectedness of this type of landscape to the rest of the world’s natural systems.

Maran wove an intricate web of astounding stories of Muir’s poetic ease within the wilderness, painting the picture of a man truly synchronised with the processes of the natural world. Though Muir is widely known for his writings, Maran provoked that Muir would have posed the following question- “Why would anyone want to read about the wilderness in a book when they could go and see it for themselves?”

The performance communicated memories of a time when the possibility of conservationism as a precaution was infinite. Not short of eco-inspiration, John Muir: Rhapsody in Green is a motivating production that celebrates one of the best environmental figures to emerge from Scotland.


 

John Muir: Rhapsody in Green runs at Valvona & Crolla Aug 8-9, 11, 13-14, 16, 18-20, 22-24 August, times vary. Please check the website for more details. 

Have you attended John Muir. Rhapsody in Green? Feel free to share your thoughts of the performance on Twitter @CCScotland using #GreenFests.

The post #GreenFests Highlights of John Muir: Rhapsody in Green appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Call for Articles: Performing Ethos

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Performing Ethos: ‘Performing Ecos’ (special themed issue of Performing Ethos).

Guest editors: Bronwyn Preece (Independent Artist/Scholar), Jess Allen (University of Manchester) and Stephen Bottoms (University of Manchester)

Global climate change is catalysing an examination of ecological ethics. Humanity’s continuing failure to respond meaningfully to the impending environmental crisis has been characterized by philosopher Stephen M. Gardiner as a ‘perfect moral storm’. How are these ethical imperatives currently being addressed through, or as, performance? This edition aims to examine critically how ecological ethics and ethos may be supporting and challenging the current range of practices. ‘Performing Ecos’ will be among the first journal to specifically unpack and foreground the ethics that now underpin performance and/as ecology. The journal will be published in Autumn 2015, and seeks to collate an international response to the following questions:

How are contemporary performance practices being critically challenged by an ecological ethos? How does ‘ecology’ challenge how performance theorists think about ‘ethics’?
What are the ethics of framing climate change and other geophysical processes in terms of performance? (e.g. Kershaw’s article in Performance Research, volume 1 issue 4)
Are the ‘ethics’ of ecological performance being conceived and scribed with the same multivocality that they espouse (i.e. incorporation and/or appropriation of indigenous voices)?
Is ecological performance cultivating, reinforcing or challenging a gendered aesthetic?
How do the aesthetics of ecological performance differ across practices (ecocritical, site-specific, activist) and across continents?
Contributions in a diversity of presentation formats, from formal papers to artists’ pages are invited. Articles should be between 5000-7000 words. (Artist Pages do not need to conform to this designation). Accompanying photographs are encouraged. ‘Performing Ecos’ will include book reviews.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract by 15 August 2014 to Bronwyn Preece: improvise [at] bronwynpreece [dot] com. Please include a 100-word biographical statement with your submission. Selected submissions will be due by 31 October 2014, and final drafts will be selected at the end of May 2015. Performing Ethos uses the Harvard citation style. Submissions must comply with the Intellect Journal Style Guide: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/MediaManager/File/style%20guide(journals)-1.pdf

Additionally, this special issue will include a centre-spread, which will include a 100-word reflective response from contributors to the same question: what is YOUR ethic of performance and/as ecology?

News page: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/weblog/view-Post,id=69631

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Intellect/81012892121

Twitter: https://twitter.com/IntellectBooks/status/487161990188924928

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)

– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)

– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)

– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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The Content of Nothing :: Part 1 :: The Ether

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

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Judy Spark: “Aerial Coil” (B/W print Courtesy of BT Archives) and “Of Origins Unknown; the Galena Radio”
from Tuning to the Ether, Cupar Festival of Visual Art, 2009

 

Judy Spark: This work, consisting of a series of archive prints and a set of hand-made radios constructed from odds and ends such as copper wire, pencil leads and safety pins, was made for Cupar Visual Arts Festival in 2009. I had come across some references to a little known aspect of the town, which was that it played a part in the development of transatlantic telephony in the late 1920s. As a result of this work I later, in 2011, undertook a short residency in Cupar, the focus of which was to explore this matter in more depth. It transpires that the town and the area around it, sits in a sort of natural dip in the land that is said to be especially disposed towards the reception of LW radio signals. I was particularly interested in a letter that I came across in the BT Archive in London, written by a Mr Jacks of Cupar in 1928 to a Mr J. D. Taylor of the Institute of Electrical Engineers in receipt of a cheque he had been issued in exchange for allowing the positioning of telephone lines across his land. He states:

“I know nothing of wireless initiatives, but judging from the results we have from continental stations, I think our quiet, damp, elevated hollow must have special facilities for reception.”

And there is some scientific grounding for this theory.

I have a long-standing interest in what may be present around us, but unseen, unperceived, or at least not fully. Radio communications, and their relation to natural phenomena are for me therefore, highly intriguing. I have recently made an exploration of this relationship through writing, in a paper entitled The Environing Air. The paper explores the intertwining of the natural and the technological through the case study of a particular communications installation in Assynt in the far north west of Scotland. A phenomenological description – phenomenology being the science of direct experience – of the installation is made in service of this aim but also by drawing on elements of physics, that are perhaps less easy to experience directly. This combined approach is considered as a legitimate phenomenological ‘method’, one very well articulated by the philosopher Anthony Steinbock.

Link to PDF, extract from The Environing Air

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Samantha Clark: Photos taken by SC circa 1981 featuring the artist’s father assembling a home-made 2m antenna above Loch Torridon

 

Samantha Clark: It’s fascinating to discover the links between our practices, because the notion of ‘The Subtle Ether’ has been an interest in my own work for a long time; an ongoing preoccupation with gaps, absences, distance, longing, nothing, the hidden or invisible, and the notion of ‘between-ness’, the ether as something postulated to fill the gaps between everything, explaining how light travels. What is between things? What is ‘no-thing’? Ask that question and another follows: What is a ‘thing?.’ And that’s when everything starts to get very intriguing. The work is really a way to look at these questions from all angles, creatively, visually, philosophically, lyrically. I was drawn towards the explorations of these questions that emerge in continental philosophy, especially in the tradition of phenomenology, and the insights that approach gives into role of absence in perception. There seem to be parallels between phenomenology and aspects of Buddhist philosophy, in which ‘things’ are understood as not having ‘own-being’, that is not existing from their ‘own side’, but presenting themselves as confluences, more or less momentary, of millions upon millions of causes and conditions, including the observer. So the object becomes less of a static ‘thing’ and more like a standing wave, what is termed by Husserl a ‘pole of identity’ within this flow of percepts. This way of seeing brings everything alive; things and the stuff between things all start to get involved. It strikes me as an intrinsically ecological way of seeing.

So, I have come from a visual art practice into philosophy and ‘academic’ writing, and now am working on a PhD on Creative Writing, still unpacking this notion of ‘the Subtle Ether’, using this as a kind of metaphorical hook on which to hang a related set of ideas.

I had been preoccupied with these ideas for a long time but the personal relevance only really came home to me after my father died and I began to clear his things. He worked for 45 years as a telecoms engineer for the BBC, from wartime radio to the early days of television, retiring just at the point when digital technology was coming in. After he retired he carried on as an enthusiastic Radio HAM and maker of remote control models. I came across photographs (above) recently, which I think I took, on a family holiday to Torridon. We had hiked up the hill where my Dad assembled this yagi antenna to see what 2 metre radio signals might be propagating through that landscape. The two metre band is a portion of the VHF radio spectrum allocated for amateur use. Its signal is usually fairly local, a few miles or so, unless bounced onwards by a repeater station. But sometimes the signals can travel huge distances. Occasionally, signal bending caused by changes in the ionosphere caused by sunspots, metors or auroras can allow 2 metre signals to carry hundreds or even thousands of miles. With enough power behind it, a signal can be bounced from the face of the moon. A person transmitting through the earth’s atmosphere to the moon may hear the end of his own transmission returning, an echo crossing a wide canyon. To me, as a kid, this kind of expedition didn’t feel any more technological than the fishing trips we also used to go on – picking a likely spot, keeping an eye on weather, assembling the fishing rod or home-made antenna, waiting, watching, hopefully catching something that had been ‘swimming’ in ether/water. Of course, now we know that electromagnetic radiation from man-made sources is suspected of affecting bees, even some ‘electrosensitive’ humans. So it’s not completely innocent either. Mind you, neither is fishing.

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Judy Spark on Drumcarrow Hill, Cupar testing the reception of her handmade radios.

I find the ‘ether’ such an interesting nothing-thing because it really is ‘between-ness’ – it oscillates between natural and technological, between nothing and something, rational and irrational, science and poetry, distance and intimate connection, and it’s also something to do with human relationships, in the silence and (mis)communication within families. It’s a word that is a constant shapeshifter, reflecting our cultural preoccupations and scientific ideas right back at us. It gave birth to the science of electricity and magnetism, and yet also Spiritualism and Mesmerism. It gets debunked as one thing, ‘the luminiferous ether’, and keeps coming back as something else, dark energy perhaps, or the Higgs Field.
Judy Spark on Drumcarrow Hill, Cupar testing the reception of her handmade radios.

 

 

 

References:

Heidegger, M. Being and Time Trans. John Macquarrie & Edward Robinson (Oxford: Blackwell, 1962) [1926]

Spark, J. “The Environing Air: A Meditation on Communications Installations in Natural Environments” in PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture
Vol 8, No1 (2013) PP 185 – 207.

Steinbock, A.J. “Back to the Things Themselves: Introduction”. Human Studies 20 (The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997) pp.127–135.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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#GreenFests: Taking a Walk

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Featured Image: “A Walk At the Edge of the World” / Photo: Nicholas Bone

Creative Carbon Scotland’s blogger-in-residence Allison Palenske reflects on walking-inspired events at the Edinburgh Art Festival and Edinburgh Festival Fringe

In a city of street performers fighting tooth and nail for any sort of audible reaction from audience members, it seems strange for a performer to ask you to be silent. Silence, or more specifically walking in silence, is a common theme shared by a pair of productions at the Edinburgh Art Festival and Edinburgh Festival Fringe, offering audience participants a refreshing meditative experience amid Edinburgh’s buzzing festival atmosphere.

We joined Deveron Arts this past Friday, 1 August, for their Urbanscape + Ruralsprawl performance and discussion. The day was full with activity, being led by artists Tim Knowles and Ania Bas for walks in, around, up and down the sprawling corridors of Summerhall. To thematically complement our time with Deveron Arts, we also attended A Walk at the Edge of the World, a production by Magnetic North featuring actor Ian Cameron. The performance involved a silent walk along the Water of Leith, both beginning and ending at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, followed by Cameron’s performance, narrating a collection of anecdotes inspired by walks.

It is difficult to reflect on these events without tracing the history of walking within the contemporary arts, as important precedents have paved a metaphoric path for these more recent explorations. The artist and the walk is a methodology often explored and easily implemented, valuable to an artist’s singular practice but also more collaborative social practices.

Often thought to be the contemporary innovators of walking as an artistic practice, the Situationists were a group of artists and intellectuals active from the late 1950’s to early 1970’s. Inspired by Dada, Surrealism and Lettrism the group owes much of its leadership to Guy Debord (a French Marxist theorist, writer and filmmaker). The Situationists embraced the idea of the dérive– a directionless wander through the context of a landscape, most often a city landscape, with the intention of inciting a particular emotion or behaviour from the participant. With their strong political ties to Marxism, these walks also became an opportunity to react to the capitalist-driven rhythm of the contemporary industrialised city.

British land artist Richard Long is also indubitably relevant to the artistic practice of walking. Known for his “epic walks, sometimes lasting many days, to remote parts of the world,” Long’s creations embody his action through and within a landscape, turning over conventions of landscape representation by more conventional means. Falling somewhere between a meditation and an intervention, Long’s works are well recognised across the international art network.

Our time with Deveron Arts was split between a complete immersion of action through the context of Summerhall and more thoughtful provocations that arose from the afternoon’s seminar. The morning began with participatory performances by Ania Bas and Tim Knowles. Bas, co-founder of The Walking Reading Group on Participation, led us through Summerhall on the same route multiple times, altering the experience each time by asking participants to walk in pairs and either speak, remain silent or allow their partner to guide them as they walked with their eyes closed along the corridors. Knowles’ approach to participation involved a fast-paced jolt through Summerhall, using a communication technique similar to a game of Chinese whispers.

After the active-rich morning, the group reconvened at the Creative Scotland headquarters, to hear from artist/poet Alec Finlay and artist Gill Russell, along with Ania Bas and Tim Knowles, with artist/writer/curator Dave Beech.

Highlights from the afternoon session included the following-

Finlay shared thoughts from his work involving the reading of the Gaelic landscape through place names, often drawing attention to eroded ecologies of places whose names may no longer be illustrative of the environment specific to that given area. Finlay noted “nature is indifferent to our walking.”

Russell discussed her practice of walking, and how this methodology has exposed historical, geological, political and ecological layers of the landscape. She also shared a humorous anecdote about tracing an ancient Pict walk that was interrupted by a modern-day wind farm; an experience the artist described as drawing awareness to the “surreal duality of the area.”

Bas elaborated on her use of walking as methodology for communication and social behaviour, as she uses the techniques implemented earlier in the day at Summerhall with her walking reading group to provoke conversation and allowing for equal participation amongst all members.

Knowles’ projects bring both urban and rural applications of walking to his practice. Playing with concepts of being taken ‘wherever the wind leads you,’ or the translation of an immersive forest walk for a gallery context, Knowles’ work often brings a new context to participatory practice.

AwardShortly after attending Deveron Art’s Urbanscape + Ruralsprawl event and symposium we found ourselves “walk(ing) at the edge of the world” with performer Ian Cameron from Magnetic North. A Walk at the Edge of the World is a contender for the Edinburgh Fringe Sustainable Practice Award, due to its thematic links to sustainability and the low material impact of the production. The performance began with Ian Cameron requesting we remain silent during the entirety of a twenty-minute walk along the Water of Leith. As Summerhall hosted the event at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, the location of this walk provided a beautiful stretch of the city’s major waterway. While Cameron’s performances usually take place in more rural settings, the refuge of this hidden bit of the city provided a powerful immersive contrast for those who attended.

After a meditative walk, we were brought into a theatre to listen to Cameron’s monologue. Cameron explained his history of walking, citing a key instance of when he began walking freely, rather than adhering to a path prescribed by a guidebook. In this instance, he had been following a trail, out of a rather old guidebook he noted, that was abruptly interrupted by a motorway perpendicular to the path. After relying on the guidebook’s prescribed trails for a number of walks, Cameron’s mind was sent into a flurry- what does he do now, where does he go from here? Resolutely, he began following the motorway, quickly losing any sense of a trail, and thus realised that walking freely gave a sense of elation and infinite possibility.

What emerged from these performances and discussions is the idea that walking can be a convenient tool for contextual artworks. Using and working within the context that is already existing can be more effective than a permanent creation that simply responds to a remote context. An interesting provocation mentioned at the Urbanscape + Ruralsprawl discussion was the acknowledgment of the tension between capturing a moment permanently and the ephemeral act of walking. Aside from the aforementioned ideologies that are aligned with this mode of practice, the performances we recently viewed and discussed are extremely lo-fi in their production materials; rather than imposing a set and props on a location, the context is the set and the participants are the props and actors. The low material impact of these pieces on their respective contexts allows a more authentic experience, as well as a more environmentally sustainable one.

Whether a healthy pastime or a means to ‘jiggle thinking’ (in the words of Alec Finlay), walking as an artistic practice can reflect past environmental and social conditions and can also readapt itself infinitely to contemporary contexts.


Urbanscape + Ruralsprawl was a one-off event on 1 August 2014 organised by Deveron Arts in collaboration with the Edinburgh Art Festival. A Walk at the Edge of the World runs 6, 8, 10, 12-17, 19-24 August 2014 from 17.00-18.10 as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

Do you have experiences walking within an artistic context? We’d love to hear your thoughts via Twitter @CCScotland using #GreenFests

The post #GreenFests: Taking a Walk appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Opportunity: ASCUS Paid Internship

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

ASCUS Internship open for applications  

Paid Internship: Project Coordination and Fundraising

ASCUS are looking for an intern, with an immediate start, to assist us with project coordination and fundraising. This is a great opportunity to work with ASCUS: an organisation comprising a network of artists and scientists committed to the art science intersection and to art science collaborative practice, science communication, and trans-disciplinary research. To be eligible for the internship you must have studied in Scotland (at school or degree level).

As a Project Coordination and Fundraising Intern you will be responsible for:

  • Managing project activities
  • Project evaluation
  • Liaising with project partners / ASCUS members
  • Website and social media support
  • Identifying and applying for funding
  • Coordinating ASCUS volunteers

The internship duration is 3 months and is 20 hours per week (part time), paid at £7.65 per hour.

For application information please see:

http://www.ascus.org.uk/internship-project-coordination-fundraising/

Closing date is 14th August at 5pm.

Volunteer Opportunities

ASCUS is a non-profit organisation run by a dedicated team of volunteers. If you are interested in getting more involved with any aspect of ASCUS then please send an email to general@ascus.org.uk with ‘request volunteer’ as the subject to be added to our special ASCUS Volunteer Mailing list. Once on the list you will be informed of all opportunities and invited to all our meetings.

The post Opportunity: ASCUS Paid Internship appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

———-

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Song of the Earth at #edfringe

AwardThis show is part of the Fringe Sustainable Practice Award Shortlist – celebrating the greenest and most sustainable shows at the Fringe.

A woman escaping from noisy modern life finds herself in a garden, the shelter of gods, through an inner flux helped by songs, she shares reflections, visions and epiphanies. Can gardens be our natural rebellion against modernity? She tells thoughts of some extraordinary travellers and eternal spirits leading us towards secret truths: Hildegard von Bingen, Raimon Panikkar, Pierre Rabhi and Vita Sackville West. 45 minutes of trance, this electro-folk hypnotic musical will lead us to the depths of the earth, through enchanting metaphysical dimensions.

From Gruppo del Cerchio, written and directed by Carola Benedetto, translated and produced by Luciana Ciliento and performed by Susanna Paisio.

 For more information or to purchase tickets click HERE.