Yearly Archives: 2014

LAGI 2014 Copenhagen

This post comes to you from Green Public Art

LAGI 2014 invites artists, architects, engineers, and designers to collaborate on an idea for what infrastructure art of sustainable cities looks like by considering clean energy generation within the context of public art. DEADLINE May 18, 2014!

WATCH: European Commissioner for Climate Action, Connie Hedegaard calls for creativity in the conception of renewable energy infrastructure

The main goal of the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) is to design and construct public art installations that have the added benefit of utility-scale clean energy generation. The works will serve to inspire and educate while they provide renewable power to thousands of homes around the world. This year LAGI and Refshaleøen Holding are holding the LAGI 2014 ideas competition in Copenhagen.

As Copenhagen (the European Green Capital in 2014) moves towards carbon neutral status by 2025, the debate over the aesthetic manifestation and human interaction component of our new energy infrastructure is becoming increasingly important to the planning strategies required to attain zero-carbon sustainability goals.

The 2010 LAGI design competition was held for three sites in the UAE and received hundreds of submissions from over 40 countries. In 2012, in partnership with New York City’s Department of Parks & Recreation the design competition was held for a site within Freshkills Park (the former Fresh Kills Landfill) and received 250 submissions from around the world.

More info here: http://landartgenerator.org/designcomp/

Download Design Guidelines here

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Rebecca Ansert, founder of Green Public Art, is an art consultant who specializes in artist solicitation, artist selection, and public art project management for both private and public agencies. She is a graduate of the master’s degree program in Public Art Studies at the University of Southern California and has a unique interest in how art can demonstrate green processes or utilize green design theories and techniques in LEED certified buildings.

Green Public Art is a Los Angeles-based consultancy that was founded in 2009 in an effort to advance the conversation of public art’s role in green building. The consultancy specializes in public art project development and management, artist solicitation and selection, creative community involvement and knowledge of LEED building requirements. Green Public Art also works with emerging and mid-career studio artists to demystify the public art process. The consultancy acts as a resource for artists to receive one-on-one consultation before, during, and after applying for a public art project.

Go to Green Public Art

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Eco- Island Amager, under Sharing Copenhagen

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Cultura21 Nordic proposes the project Eco-Island Amager, under the auspices ofSharing Copenhagen – Copenhagen as European Green Capital in 2014 .

The 96 sq. km island of Amager is a polyvalent space imbued with ever-shifting meanings. It is also a part of Copenhagen, which could become a centre for culturally driven and sustainability-motivated change in an urban environment. Our vision is that, by observing the actual life of the island/city, with locally active agents of change, by mapping and conceptualizing potentials for a new identity, we can visualize paths and trigger points inviting Amager to creating a new life for itself, as an Eco-Island in a green city.

What is an eco-island? This is a question which Eco-Island Amager sets out to answer in Cultura21’s spirit of collaborative, creative and community-oriented interventions. The aim is that the project will give way to new learning, and to translate new insights into a number of specific innovative, transdisciplinary projects. All along the project, we will build on practice-derived knowledge and seek to develop new practices through creative reflection.

The project is divided into three stages, unfolding gradually from April to October, and is part of the official programme of Sharing Copenhagen .

The first step was a ‘mapping visions’ workshop, which took place on the24th-25th of April, in the beautiful Dome of Visions. This stage was dedicated to sketching the contours of the (intertwined, natural, social, economic, and cultural) eco-systems found on the island. The workshop has drawn on the varied experiences and knowledge of the diverse local actors, stake-holders of the island, and mapping experts, focusing on finding possible interactions and connections in and between the selected 9 zones of the project on Amager.

The second stage of our intervention consists of exploring the 9 transectsidentified in the mapping process. Each transect will last a day, with the 9 walks stretching from June to September 2014. The transect is a field-based method of investigation, grounded in the texture of the selected areas, which are approached on foot. The exploration of the transects will also be transdisciplinary events, learning from the knowledge and capacities of participants (as anthropologists, local citizens, artists, ecologists, entrepreneurs, etc). The explorations have as starting point the level of local realities. Therefore, each one will focus on some issues more than others: re-conceptualisation of a commercial street and main traffic ore(Amagerbrogade); refurbishment of post-industrial areas (Refshaleøen);interactions between population and nature in a new urban natural park(Naturpark Amager); crossing over of urban and natural life in a new residential area (Ørestad), and more. All transects will be open to the public, and all will include reflective symposiums, inviting also international action-researchers, scholars, artists – and Cultura21’s network and readers – to participate. A call will be issued within the next days.

Finally, building on the knowledge gathered during the first two stages, the project will end with the Eco-Creative Eco Island Camp, taking place onOctober 31st and November 1st, in an 18th century building by the sea, next to what used to be the active fishing harbour of Kastrup. The summit will be a creative encounter between stakeholders, a productive reflection on the Eco-Island Amager project, but also a starting point for developing projects strengthening the impact of Eco Island Amager in the future, an international hotspot for discussing urban mapping for sustainability, and a presentation and sharing of the prototype version of the Eco Island Amager Atlas. This event will also be in the call for participation. The nine concrete project proposals having originated in the mappings, transects and subsequent reflections, will be gaining shape and we hope these to be the first steps towards a new life for Amager as an Eco Island. Furthermore, by addressing the local issues in Amager, we invite to rethinking global issues and wish to spread the methods and the findings to all parts of the world where they would resonate.

Read more about the project here , and find our call for participation which is to be issued shortly.
Contact Oleg Koefoed (oleg [at] cultura21 [dot] dk) or Stine Avlund (stine [at] cultura21 [dot] dk), of Cultura21 in Copenhagen , for details or to inquire about potential collaboration.

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)

– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)

– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)

– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Living Symphonies

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Living Symphonies is a sound installation based upon the forest ecosystem. The piece will tour four of England’s forests in 2014 in partnership with Forestry Commission England, Sound And Music and with support from Arts Council England.

Locations

  1. Thetford Forest (24 May — 1 June 2014)
  2. Fineshade Woods (20 — 26 June 2014)
  3. Cannock Chase (26 July — 1 August 2014)
  4. Bedgebury Pinetum (25 — 31 August 2014)

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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Mel Chin at New Orleans Museum of Art

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Mel Chin: Rematch
February 21–May 25, 2014

Bild 4

The most expansive presentation of conceptual artist Mel Chin’s work to date, Mel Chin: Rematch, organized by the New Orleans Museum of Art, features the artist’s sculptures, video, drawings, paintings, land, and performance art, as well as rarely seen materials from the last four decades. The exhibition explores the themes that connect Chin’s diverse artistic practice, including violence, alchemy, memory, and empathy, and for the first time contextualizes his major site-specific installations within his broader oeuvre. On view from February 21 to May 25, Mel Chin: Rematch emphasizes Chin’s artistic process and conceptual approach and reveals how his engagement with social justice and community collaborations manifest in a complex and highly varied body of work.

The objects in the exhibition will be presented around thematic strands that underscore Chin’s broad range of subject matter, materials, and formal approaches. The exhibition includes major installations such as Operation of the Sun though the Cult of the Hand, 1987, which features a variety of materials through which Chin explored the origins of Eastern and Western alchemy; as well as the more recent installation: The Funk & Wag from A to Z, 2012, a surrealist large-scale arrangement of 524 collages culled from the Funk and Wagnalls encyclopedia. The exhibition also includes documentation of his major land-based projects, from early works such as The Earthworks: See/Saw, 1976, to later ecological, science-based projects like Revival Field, begun in 1990. For this exhibition Chin will also create a new work, a 2013 conceptual diorama for Revival Field, an updated take on this artwork which played a seminal role in promoting the field of phytoremediation, or the use of plants in treating toxic soil.

His recent venture Operation Paydirt, which was conceived from his 2008 research in New Orleans, is an interdisciplinary project that is continuing to generate thousands of children’s drawings in an effort to garner funding and support for the development of an effective nation-wide method for the prevention of childhood lead poisoning. The project has led to collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency, and a major grant in 2011 from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to scientists who are testing soil remediation methods in New Orleans.

Mel Chin: Rematch is organized by Miranda Lash, the Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the New Orleans Museum of Art.
New Orleans Museum of Art
1 Collins Diboll Circle
New Orleans, LA 70124
Hours: Fridays, 10am–9pm; Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, and Thursdays 10am–6pm;
Saturdays–Sundays 11am–5pm

More Info

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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A cool look at climate | Red Pepper

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

“It is easy to focus on writing technical scientific papers, or argue that the situation is complex and therefore not so alarming. It is easy to think only about the details and not the big picture.”

Four leading UK scientists and five questions – it’s important to read this and share it.

Corinne Le Quéré is Professor of Climate Change Science and Policy at the University of East Anglia and Director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research,

Sir Robert Watson is the former Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (1997-2002) who has worked on atmospheric science issues including ozone depletion and global warming since the 1980s,

Dr Simon Lewis is a Reader in Global Change Science at the University College London and the University of Leeds

Kevin Anderson is Professor of Energy and Climate Change in the School of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Civil Engineering at the University of Manchester and Deputy Director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research.

and the questions (and these are the critical questions),

What do you consider to be a safe temperature increase after which dangerous climate change occurs?

What chance do you think the world has of staying below 2°C of warming?

If adequate action is not taken on climate change, what will the world look like in 50 or 100 years in terms of global temperatures, environmental, social and economic impacts?

Can you give an idea of the level and speed of changes our governments need to make to avert catastrophic climate change?

As someone whose job gives them a deep understanding of the bleak future facing the planet and humanity, how do you personally deal with this on an emotional and psychological level?

A cool look at climate | Red Pepper.

A cool look at climate | Red Pepper

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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Cultures of Sustainability in the Age of Climate Crisis

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Telemark University College

Bø, May 13.-15. (Tue-Thu), 2014 

The aim of the COST Action IS1007 meeting is to provide new perspectives and practical examples of the transformative role of culture for a sustainable future. The symposium will investigate the many ways of integrating perspectives on cultural change, social learning, experience-based training, innovation and creativity to grasp the role of culture in sustainable development, working with a dynamic concept of culture (culture as process and communication). Today, climate change and climate crisis roams high on the international agenda. At the same time, financial and economic crisis in many parts of Europe may overshadow the climate crisis. How to reconcile, and what role may art and culture represent in this respect?

Dr. Sacha Kagan, of Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany, who is on the board of Cultura21 Germany and active on the international level of C21, is also invited to speak.

Find out more about the program.

The meeting is organized by the Department of Culture and Humanities, Telemark University College.

Fee: 110 € covering the scientific program, conference materials, lunches and coffee breaks, conference dinner, and the extra-scientific program.

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Blog: Mulling it Over

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Director of Creative Carbon Scotland, Ben Twist, gives us his reflections on our recent artist residency – Mull, thinking about art and sustainability.

A couple of week’s ago Creative Carbon Scotland went with ten artists to Mull in brilliant weather for an intense and powerful weekend long discussion about what it might be like to be an artist in a sustainable Scotland, and what we at CCS needed to do to engage more artists in this debate. It was exhausting and exhilarating with hours of discussion, an exercise involving listening and imagining what might be there in a future Scotland, and many cups of tea (and a few beers and glasses of wine). Our thanks to Comar in Mull for hosting us.

We had two facilitators, composer Dave Fennessy and producer Suzy Glass. Dave is self-confessedly a newcomer to thinking about sustainability – he might well have said ‘what’s this got to do with me sitting in my room composing?’ – whilst Suzy has more experience with the ideas. We’d asked them to structure the discussion precisely because they had different takes on the idea of sustainability. The eight participating artists (two fell by the wayside) had been selected for their varying experience and knowledge of sustainability and different disciplines.

Gemma and I provided some harder facts dosed with poetic licence, on the Saturday evening, by painting a picture of what Scotland might look like physically and socially in 2050. We described a country with hotter, drier summers; milder, wetter winters; and more extreme weather events, increased flooding and raised sea levels. Crops such as apricots and tomatoes would grow well, whilst a quarter of the country would be covered in forest and we would be increasing the size of peatbogs to capture more carbon. Meanwhile Scotland’s ethnic diversity had increased as people fled a southern Europe too hot to live in and climate refugees from the developing world and Eastern Europe came to the UK. Interestingly London had become too hot for comfort and the northern cities had become increasingly attractive. Travel had become much more expensive and the era of cheap flights to artists’ residencies and for touring performances had come to an end.

What did we learn? One thing that came out of it very strongly was that whilst much of our work with arts organisations has been about carbon reduction, the discussions over the weekend were all about adaptation to a low carbon environment. This makes the most of individual artists’ ability to imagine other futures – an idea that has always had resonance for me as my own field, theatre, is in many ways a thought experiment where the artists and audience together imagine a possible other world.

Also important was a combination of a thirst for knowledge, ideas and the opportunity for discussion of these topics with a richness of individual experience and thinking about them already. We all learned a great deal about each other’s practice, how it had been affected by thinking about sustainability and how it might be affected by the weekend’s work. This reflects our experience of working with arts organisations – there’s a great deal going on already but the need to bring it together and share the learning.

Finally there’s a real need for a wider resource of writing, information and artistic work on sustainability, the environment and art in all its shapes and forms. We’ll create a new area of the CCS website for a library of this material and we hope you’ll contribute to it once it’s ready.

Thanks to our facilitators and artists, Suzy Glass, Dave Fennessey, Angharad McLaren, Hannah Imlach, Alex South, Catrin Evans, Tom Butler, Natalie McIlroy, Jake Bee and Rachel Duckhouse for their enormous contributions.

Image: Tom Butler – Mull

The post Blog: Mulling it Over appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;

Communicating with their audiences;

Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Green Culture Conference

This post comes to you from Cultura21

GREEN CULTURE CONFERENCE, 15-17 MAY, 2014, MONTENEGRO

The Green Culture Conference is one of the groundbreaking events in Southeast Europe to address the role the Creative Industries play in environmental sustainability.

Green-Culture-Conference

Those working in the Arts & Culture have always been social leaders. Without them, some of the greatest achievements, discoveries and historical moments would not have been possible. Artists and cultural workers are some of the most influential and strongest catalysts of change, and when it comes to sustainability, their presence is pivotal. This hands-on and interactive conference will bring to light the latest achievements and developments in sustainability within the Creative Industries. You will learn what your regional and international colleagues have been up to, share your own innovative ideas and projects, and gain a better understanding of what sustainability means in SEE. Through knowledge exchange, brainstorming, and workshops, you will set the sustainability agenda for the region.

Efforts to progress sustainability most definitely include sustainable building and architecture. Sustainable living is directly connected to sustainable building, which is especially pressing for this part of the vulnerable Adriatic coastline due to the high volume of developments over the past 20 years. Therefore, the conference will feature a special segment on Green Building.

Montenegro’s town of Tivat will be the host for this year’s conference.

  • By participating in three days of insightful presentations, stimulating discussions, and inspiring workshops, with a fabulous line-up of evening entertainment.
  • By sharing knowledge, exchanging ideas and acquiring tools on how to incorporate sustainable practices into everyday work and living.
  • By getting the latest industry news from around the globe from regional and international experts and talking with them face-to-face to widen professional creative networks.
  • By stimulating action and creating specific tasks to set concrete goals and milestones for future progress.

More Information.

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)

– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)

– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)

– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Performers make video statements about climate change

This post comes to you from Culture|Futures

The Climate Message Video Festival is an online initiative that brings together musicians from all over the world to increase awareness of climate change. They don’t meet in real life, they all meet on Youtube. Festival organiser and jazz musician Warren Senders from USA aims to have uploaded an even 1,000 videos by Earth Day on 22 April 2014.

climate-message_warren-send

“Whether we reach that number or not, the video festival will keep on keepin’ on. The goal is to have sounds and voices from all over the world saying in as many different languages and styles as possible that the time to get serious about climate change is now.”

“As a musician, as a human being, and as a citizen of Planet Earth, I can say that we all need to be committed to the fight against global climate change, so that our songs can go on to generations in the future.”Warren Senders

If you’re a performer in any idiom, you can join the Climate Message Video Festival – an online initiative bringing together musicians from all over the world to increase awareness of climate change: www.theclimatemessage.com

To make a Climate Message video, here’s how: 
Use a smartphone or webcam (or a friend’s) and record about a minute’s worth of your music and talking. Then email it to theclimatemessage@gmail.com, along with your name, contact information, and any details you want included.

Warren Senders will then upload it to the YouTube channel, and feature it on The Climate Message website. Eventually all the videos will be linked to an interactive world map.


Climate Message from Warren Senders, teacher and performer of Indian classical music, Medford, Massachusetts, USA


Climate Message from Banning Eyre, radio broadcaster, writer, musician, Connecticut, USA


Climate Message from Jarrett Cherner – piano – Brooklyn, New York, USA

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Culture|Futures is an international collaboration of organizations and individuals who are concerned with shaping and delivering a proactive cultural agenda to support the necessary transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.

The Cultural sector that we refer to is an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, inter-genre collaboration, which encompasses policy-making, intercultural dialogue/cultural relations, creative cities/cultural planning, creative industries and research and development. It is those decision-makers and practitioners who can reach people in a direct way, through diverse messages and mediums.

Affecting the thinking and behaviour of people and communities is about the dissemination of stories which will profoundly impact cultural values, beliefs and thereby actions. The stories can open people’s eyes to a way of thinking that has not been considered before, challenge a preconceived notion of the past, or a vision of the future that had not been envisioned as possible. As a sector which is viewed as imbued with creativity and cultural values, rather than purely financial motivations, the cultural sector’s stories maintain the trust of people and society.

Go toThis post comes to you from Culture|Futures

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beyond earth art: contemporary artists and the environment

This post comes to you from Cultura21

bea-banner

Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University – January 25–June 8, 2014

The Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University presents beyond earth art: contemporary artists and the environment, on view now through June 8, comprising separate installations and exhibitions throughout the museum. The project was curated by Andrea Inselmann, curator of modern and contemporary art & photography at the Johnson Museum.

Artist talks and symposium: April 10–11

Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
Hours: Tuesdays–Sundays 10am–5pm

On Thursday, April 10 at 5:15pm in Milstein Hall Auditorium, Maya Lin will discuss her work, including her recent sculptures and the installation Empty Room, on view in beyond earth artLucy Orta will give a gallery talk during the subsequentreception at the Johnson, from 6:30 to 7:30pm.

On Friday, April 11, the Johnson will host a daylong beyond earth art symposium funded by Cornell’s Atkinson Forum in American Studies Program, with presentations by Suzaan Boettger, art historian/critic; William L. Fox, director of the Center for Art + Environment, Nevada Museum of Art; Amy Lipton, co-director of ecoartspace; and artists Christian Houge and Lucy Orta. Registration is free but seating is limited; email (eas8 [at] cornell [dot] edu) or call +1 607 254 4642 to reserve a space by April 4.

In 1969 the legendary Earth Art exhibition took place at Cornell. Curated by Willoughby Sharp (1936–2008), site-specific installations by a number of international artists were scattered around campus and the surrounding Ithaca area. The commissioned pieces sought to eschew the commodity status of the art object and to question the role of institutions. The dissolution of boundaries in art—between object and context, different mediums, and the work of art and its documentation—was a hallmark of the time, reflecting 1960s counterculture more broadly. It is at this intersection—where art meets life and art becomes activism—that the influence of the 1960s earth artists has had the most significant impact on a current generation of artists working on issues related to ecology.

“The installations and exhibitions included in beyond earth art operate in the gap between the objectivity of scientific data and the subjectivity of creative expression, signaling the interconnectedness of themes that address issues related to the representation of landscape, water supply, food justice, recycling, fair distribution of natural resources, and the nature/culture divide,” said curator Andrea Inselmann.

The exhibition Food-Water-Life/Lucy+Jorge Orta, curated by c2 | curatorsquared and organized by the Tufts University Art Gallery, is on view as part of the beyond earth art project. The first comprehensive exhibition of work by Lucy + Jorge Orta in the United States, their sculptures, drawings, installations, and video explore major concerns that define this century—biodiversity, environmental conditions, climate change, and exchange among peoples.

Materials related to the 1969 Earth Art exhibition are on view alongside works from the Johnson’s collection by some of the Earth Art artists and others working in a similar mode in the 1970s and ’80s. The Johnson has made the complete 1969 exhibition catalogue, long out of print, available online at museum.cornell.edu/earth-art-1969.

Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art

The Johnson Museum has a permanent collection of more than 35,000 works of art from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North and South America. The museum building was designed by I. M. Pei and opened in 1973, funded by Cornell alumnus Herbert F. Johnson, late president and chairman of S C Johnson.

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)

– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)

– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)

– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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