Yearly Archives: 2014

Creative Scotland announce Environment Connecting theme

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Creative Scotland’s new funding guidelines require applicants to show how they will contribute to the Environment Connecting theme, and all funded organisations and individuals now need to report their carbon emissions from April 2014 onwards.

Creative Carbon Scotland is offering an improved programme of training and support in carbon measuring, reporting and reduction, and will hold seminars on how a positive focus on Environment can strengthen companies artistically, financially and reputationally.

Read more about our training and support programme for carbon reporting.

Read more about the Environment Connecting theme.

The post Creative Scotland announce Environment Connecting theme appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;

Communicating with their audiences;

Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Book about curatorial methodologies on climate change

This post comes to you from Culture|Futures

he book ‘Portable Nation: Disappearance as Work in Progress – Approaches to Ecological Romanticism’ offers a range of geo-political positions and research-curatorial methodologies on climate change and their approaches to ecological romanticism.

port-nat_curators

Featuring essays on the geopolitics of climate change and the idea of urgency, the book offers a comprehensive snapshot of the aesthetic, political and poetic dimensions of the situation in the island nation intertwined with a global vision of the climate emergency around the world.

The book is based on the work of curators Khaled Ramadan, Alfredo Cramerotti and Aida Eltorie who were commissioned by the Maldives Ministry of Tourism, Arts & Culture to be in charge of the exhibition at the Pavilion of Maldives for the 55th International Art Exhibition of Venize Biennale in 2013.

The book expands on several of the themes which emerged conceptually and artistically in the Maldives Pavilion exhibition and six-month-long public programme, and elaborates them in a philosophical, historical, scientific and poetic register within the specific materiality of a book, with its capacity to extend the time, space and context of the ideas beyond the Venice Biennale. It aims to engage a readership further-reaching than the project’s immediate public.

The publication is structured in three main sections: the artists and their projects presented in the Maldives Pavilion, the parallel projects over the six-month period, and the critical text section which includes interviews and thematic analysis.

port-nat_page-in-book


‘Portable Nation: Disappearance as Work in Progress – Approaches to Ecological Romanticism’

book cover

ABOUT THE BOOK
Editors: Dorian Batycka, Camilla Boemio, Alfredo Cramerotti and Aida Eltoire
Publisher: Maretti Editore
Year: 2014
Pages: 176
Language: English

MORE INFORMATION
» More information about the book at Maretti Editore:  www.marettieditore.com

EXHIBITORS
Mohamed Ali, Sama Alshaibi, Ursula Biemann, Stefano Cagol, Wael Darwesh, Moomin Fouad, Thierry Geoffrey (aka Colonel), Khaled Hafez, Heidrun Holzfeind & Christoph Draeger, Hanna Husberg, Laura McLean & Kalliopi Tsipni-Kolaza, Achilleas Kentonis & Maria Papacaharalambous, Paul Miller (aka DJ Spooky), Gregory Niemeyer, Khaled Ramadan, Oliver Ressler, Klaus Schafler, Patrizio Travagli, Wooloo.

PERFORMERS AND EVENTS
Mark Dahl, Ehsan Fardjadniya, Shani Leiderman, Celeste Pimm, Oliver Ressler, Marian Tubbs.

SUPPORT
The project was supported by the Danish Arts Council, Mookai Suites, mooinc, The Allam Foundation, bm: ukk – Austrian Federal Ministry for Education, The Arts and Culture, Kultur Steiermark-Department Culture, Europe, Foreign Relations, Pro Helvetia Swiss Arts Council, 6 Contemporary Arts, Material Fonds, HIVOS: People United, Ayyam Projects, The School of Art and College of Fine Art – University of Arizona, Art Sawa Gallery Dubai, Olympus Cinema Male, Imad Agency Photo Archive, The Maldives National Museum, Meyer Sound and CITRIS, Contemporary Practices Art Journal, Transart Institute New York, Horcynus Orca Foundation Messina, www.doculogia.com.

WEB LINKS
» Maldives Pavilion:
www.maldivespavilion.com

» Chamber of Public Secrets:
www.chamberarchive.org

VIDEOS
» www.youtube.com/watch?v=xHE4DJmJnGs

» www.doculogia.com/01doculogia.html

» www.vimeo.com/channels/essay/page:8

» www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgDEcJEnupw

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Culture|Futures is an international collaboration of organizations and individuals who are concerned with shaping and delivering a proactive cultural agenda to support the necessary transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.

The Cultural sector that we refer to is an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, inter-genre collaboration, which encompasses policy-making, intercultural dialogue/cultural relations, creative cities/cultural planning, creative industries and research and development. It is those decision-makers and practitioners who can reach people in a direct way, through diverse messages and mediums.

Affecting the thinking and behaviour of people and communities is about the dissemination of stories which will profoundly impact cultural values, beliefs and thereby actions. The stories can open people’s eyes to a way of thinking that has not been considered before, challenge a preconceived notion of the past, or a vision of the future that had not been envisioned as possible. As a sector which is viewed as imbued with creativity and cultural values, rather than purely financial motivations, the cultural sector’s stories maintain the trust of people and society.

Go toThis post comes to you from Culture|Futures

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Arts & Sustainability – Events in Singapore

This post comes to you from Cultura21

(Click on ‘More’ and scroll down for ‘UNEARTHED’ exhibition at the Singapore Art Museum)

i Light Festival

7th – 30th of March 2014, 7:30pm – 11pm, Marina Bay Waterfront, Free Admission

ILIGHT_HIRES

i Light Marina Bay is Asia’s only sustainable light art festival that showcases innovative content, the intelligent use of lighting as well as an international line-up of creative talents. Themed Light+heART, the festival this year featured 28 innovative and environmentally sustainable light art installations from around the world. The Marina Bay waterfront was transformed into a magical space of light and colour for the public to celebrate both public spaces and creativity.

A full array of events, programmes and fun activities were lined up from 7 to 30 March 2014 to create a dazzling, diverse and more enriching experience for the community. From free guided tours and entertaining performances, outdoor dining to educational talks and workshops, this festival strove to build on the achievements of the previous festivals to bring an even more enjoyable experience.

The sociologist and transdisciplinary researcher, and Board Member of Cultura21, Dr. Sacha Kagan, gave the keynote opening speech at the i Light Symposium 2014.

More Information.

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UNEARTHED

21 Mar – 6 Jul 2014, Singapore Art Museum

4

The first exhibition presented by the Singapore Art Museum (SAM) after the Singapore Biennale, UNEARTHED investigated our relationship with Earth and the natural world, and charted SAM’s new direction in encompassing and presenting projects and practices where art intersects with other disciplines and modalities.

Drawing on works from SAM’s permanent collection as well as private collections, the exhibition at SAM offered an insight on how artists in Singapore view and respond to the natural world, coming from and living in such an urban and built-up environment. As such, one strand running through the exhibition was the idea of nature as something that can be studied, controlled, and constructed – an idea that often extends into a metaphor for the nation and national identity. In contrast to the notion of a carefully cultivated ‘Garden City’, other artists regard nature as unknown, uncanny, and untamed, drawing on memories of nature’s recent incursions into the urban cityscape. Natural sites as repositories of social memory and history also featured in these artistic excavations, as artists seeked to call attention to forgotten or overlooked terrain in Singapore.

This conversation was extended with a complementary exhibition at 8Q which presented artworks that have ensued from residencies undertaken by artists from Singapore and the region at the Earth Observatory of Singapore, a research centre dedicated to the study of earth sciences and natural phenomena. By turns poetic, reflective, experimental, and urgent, these works charged us to reconsider our assumptions and attitudes towards the natural environment and phenomena beyond human control, and how life is bound up with the land.

More Details

artexhibitionsnatureSingaporesustainability

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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ANTHROPOCENE CAMPUS

This post comes to you from Cultura21
unnamedNov. 14-22, 2014
Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin
Call for Applications
Deadline: May 7, 2014
For doctoral students, post-docs, and actors from the arts, culture, politics, and society with a research orientation
More information<
Online application form

With the ANTHROPOCENE PROJECT, HKW seeks to strengthen transdisciplinary debates and studies on the multifarious implications of the Anthropocene hypothesis for cultures of knowledge. If humankind has actually become the dominant biogeophysical force effecting changes on planetary scale, how can the arts, sciences and humanities contribute to a critical awareness, understanding and responsible co-shaping of these transformations?

The collaboratively produced ANTHROPOCENE CURRICULUM takes up these challenges posed by the Anthropocene Age: since fall 2013, 27 international university teachers from the sciences, environmental studies, the humanities, and social sciences, art, and architecture have discussed new teaching content, approaches, and methods.

Together with the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin and other renowned partners, Haus der Kulturen der Welt has developed an ANTHROPOCENE CURRICULUM that seeks to explore paths for a crossdisciplinary culture of knowledge and education in an experimental and exemplary way. How can we compile a body of “earthbound knowledge,” what forms of transmission are appropriate?

An exemplary model course will for the first time be implemented and put into teaching practice at the temporary ANTHROPOCENE CAMPUS from November 14-22, 2014.

100 international doctoral students and post-docs along with actors working in the fields of arts, culture, politics, and society can contribute their perspectives and expertise. The ANTHROPOCENE CAMPUS offers a transdisciplinary platform for participants from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds, academic and professional contexts. One important result of the intense encounters and events at the campus will be a coursebook. The online platform anthropocene-curriculum.org will offer all project participants and initiators a long-term context for discussion.

Until May 7, 2014 doctoral students and post-docs from the natural sciences, humanities, social sciences, engineering, design, and art and research-oriented actors from the arts, culture, politics, and societyes (think-tanks, NGOs, etc.) can apply to participate in the campus.

This post is also available in: German

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)

– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)

– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)

– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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What is ecoart? Presentation by Mary Jo Aagerstoun

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

If you’ve ever wondered what ecoart is, this presentation might help.  It positions ecoart in relation to other environmental and nature based practices, social practices and working relations with ecologists and engineers.

Thanks to MJ of Ecoart South Florida for sharing this really interesting presentation on ecoart and interdisciplinarity.  The text of David Haley‘s that’s referenced is available here.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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Opportunity: Enthograms Micro-Residency

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

Ethnograms: A micro-residency for artists, designers, programmers and anthropologists

21st-23rd May, 2014, Dovecot Studios, Edinburgh

We welcome applications from artists, designers and programmers to participate in the Ethnograms Micro-Residency; an opportunity to work with a team of anthropologists at the University of Edinburgh to develop new ways of visualising social relationships with diagrams, info-graphics and maps.

Anthropologists Alice Street and Jamie Cross have been working in Papua New Guinea since 2003, exploring the ways in which people mobilise their relationships in order to access healthcare and energy in a place where large-scale, centralised infrastructures such as roads or power-lines are absent. Their current ESRC funded project ‘Off the Grid: Relational Infrastructures for Fragile Futures’ seeks to find new ways of visualising the relational qualities of infrastructure in such off-grid locations by harnessing the simple power of the diagram and bringing it into engagement with new technologies for web-based, interactive infographics and mapping.

Anthropology has a long history of using maps and diagrams to visualise kinship or exchange relationships, but a lack of engagement with the visual and digital arts has meant that the full potential of these visual methodologies has not been realised. Through collaborations with artists, designers and programmers, this exploratory micro-residency aims to develop a new visual form out of the complementary methods, skills, experience and knowledge of social scientists, artists, designers and programmers: the ethno-gram. Artists, designers and programmers will have the opportunity to work closely with the anthropologists and to engage with a large body of ethnographic material from Papua New Guinea.

The micro-residency will culminate in a pop-up exhibition of ‘Ethnograms’ and will feed into a larger scale public exhibition of project outputs in early 2015. Following the residency the University of Edinburgh team are looking to select an artist to collaborate with more closely and to award a £5,000 commission.

The deadline for applications is Tuesday 6th May.

Click here for the application form. Please complete and email to alice.street@ed.ac.uk.

The post Opportunity: Enthograms Micro-Residency appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

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Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;

Communicating with their audiences;

Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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The Scarcity Project

This post comes from Chantal Bilodeau’s Artists and Climate Change Blog

To celebrate the Vernal Equinox, the first day of spring when the earth’s 24 hours are split evenly between light and dark, we shared a wonderful find from Brazilian-Italian-currently-based-in-London Paulo Goldstein, a self-described “designer/maker/artist” according to his website. Incredibly talented and original, we would like to add.

So, brew yourself your favorite fair-trade beverage, sit back and let this six-minute video brighten your day.  It is a “joyful celebration of repaired objects, promoting a different narrative to scarcity by exploring and expanding the potential left behind by the anomalies of our consumer culture.”

Our favorite quote from the video:  ”Scarcity is a springboard to creativity.”

We are sure that you’ll never look at discarded rubbish in the same way again!

Thanks to Grist’s Holly Richmond for the lead.  Follow Joan on Twitter @CleanNergyPhoto or her renewable energy photo blog.

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog by playwright Chantal Bilodeau that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to Chantal Bilodeau’s Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Reports from Fukushima

This post comes to you from Ashden Directory

‘Ghost Town’, photo by and copyright Su Grierson

Wallace Heim writes:

Artist Su Grierson has been sending updates to ecoartscotland on her 10-week residency in Kitakata, Fukushima Province, Japan. Su emphasises that she is there as an artist, not a journalist, and she is only able to report what she is told, often through translation, and what she sees herself without external verification.

Su’s reports evoke the everyday life of those living with the continuing effects of the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disasters in stories of rescue, luck and tragedy.

Two excerpts:

19 February
Su visits the Scottish artist Aenaes Wilder and they drive to the coast north from Kitikata, an area decimated by the earthquake and tsunami.

‘Aenaes was keen to revisit the area which still holds horror images and a memory of the smell that he was still needing to come to terms with … He told me the story of how only one small town survived undamaged. Many years ago the Mayor of this town had insisted on building the sea defence wall many meters higher than anywhere else had even considered. He was laughed at and his wall was the subject of jokes throughout his lifetime. After 11 March his town was the only one in the area where not a single person died. The very next day the local people began laying flowers on his grave.’ more

11 February
The Director of Minamisouma City Museum guides Su and other artists through the area nearest to the nuclear disaster site.

‘We carried radiation monitors in the car (you can buy them in the Home Centre)…
Miles of empty houses including whole villages with cars, lorries and tractors left abandoned because they are too contaminated to be moved. The ghost towns with their traffic lights still working are an eerie and disturbing sight especially in near blizzard conditions. Houses of all sizes are left abandoned with police patrol cars driving round as protection. These black-and-white cars with their silent red rotating beacons add an almost holocaust atmosphere as they glide around the empty roads…

The scale of all this is so huge it is only by seeing it that any idea of scale can really be imagined. I was told that in this Province there are 100,000 refuges and 200,000 in the next Province and there are more in many other areas.’  more

The residency, involving four artists, is working towards an exhibition with the Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art on the theme Spirit of the North.
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“ashdenizen blog and twitter are consistently among the best sources for information and reflection on developments in the field of arts and climate change in the UK” (2020 Network)

ashdenizen is edited by Robert Butler, and is the blog associated with the Ashden Directory, a website focusing on environment and performance.

The Ashden Directory is edited by Robert Butler and Wallace Heim, with associate editor Kellie Gutman. The Directory includes features, interviews, news, a timeline and a database of ecologically – themed productions since 1893 in the United Kingdom. Our own projects include ‘New Metaphors for Sustainability’, ‘Flowers Onstage’ and ‘Six ways to look at climate change and theatre’.

The Directory has been live since 2000.

Go to The Ashden Directory

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New on Ashden Directory’s News Page

This post comes to you from Ashden Directory


for Burning Ice #6, copyright Sarah Vanagt

Environmental Arts Festival Scotland is calling for projects connected to land, energy, the coast, rural living, Dark Skies, climate change, and more.

Wysing Arts Centre in Cambridgeis calling for ideas on the theme of Tracing the Tacit, for retreats exploring the underlying ideas, influences and concepts informing artists’ practices.

The work of art in critical times works out on energy, economy and environment at a symposium in Falmouth.

Wasteland Conversations in Nottinghamtake on utopia, community and ecology.

Also in Nottingham, and in London, the vacuum cleaner talks: ‘I Went Mental and All I Got Was This Lousy T-Shirt’ .

And in Brussels, Kaaitheater looks at animals looking back for their Burning Ice #6 Festival.

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“ashdenizen blog and twitter are consistently among the best sources for information and reflection on developments in the field of arts and climate change in the UK” (2020 Network)

ashdenizen is edited by Robert Butler, and is the blog associated with the Ashden Directory, a website focusing on environment and performance.

The Ashden Directory is edited by Robert Butler and Wallace Heim, with associate editor Kellie Gutman. The Directory includes features, interviews, news, a timeline and a database of ecologically – themed productions since 1893 in the United Kingdom. Our own projects include ‘New Metaphors for Sustainability’, ‘Flowers Onstage’ and ‘Six ways to look at climate change and theatre’.

The Directory has been live since 2000.

Go to The Ashden Directory

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