Yearly Archives: 2014

Arts and Ecology: emerging uses for digital technologies

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Digital Creativity is a journal devoted to the intersection of the creative arts and digital technology. Concerned with both the practical and the theoretical, Digital Creativity offers a unique forum to researchers and practitioners involved in the interdisciplinary nature of making or using digital media in creative contexts. They include such disciplines as fine art, graphic design, illustration, photography,
printmaking, sculpture, 3D design, interaction design, product design, textile and fashion design, film-making, animation, games design, music, dance, drama, creative writing, poetry, interior design, architecture, and urban design.

Proposal for a special issue of Digital Creativity Vol 25 No 4

Call for papers

In this special issue, they explore the emergent practice known broadly as ‘Arts & Ecology’, a set of practices in which arts practice engages with the natural world.
Practice might be issues-based or activist in nature, or may simply have a desire to reflect upon or engage directly with nature or ecology. This special issue of the journal seeks writers, theorists, practitioners, and other researchers who can reflect on this practice and on emerging and emergent uses of digital technologies within it. Can it be said that there is a new awareness of and a newly-emergent practice of nature writing? Are ecological artists using technologies in different ways? Do
ecological pressure impact upon how we use, develop and fuel our technologies? Can renewable energy play a part in a technological arts practice? Are digital technologies changing the ways in which people can engage with the natural world? How are cultural practices remixing the digital world with the more-than-human and other-than-human worlds? We welcome philosophical and/or theoretical reflection as well as detailed descriptions of practice or critique.

Important dates:
Abstracts are due on May 1, 2014
Short/long papers are due on: July 10, 2014
Final, revised papers are due on: August 23, 2014
Expected publication: November, 2014

More Info.

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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From the Valley of the Deer on Turbulence

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Jillian Mcdonald‘s augmented reality work From the Valley of the Deer, resulting from a residency at Glenfiddich, is now accessible on the Turbulence website.

The press release is as follows,

“From the Valley of the Deer” is an augmented reality artwork based on Valley of the Deer, a video installation produced in Scotland in 2013. In each city where the installation is exhibited, local GPS coordinates will be haunted by characters and scenes from the video, discoverable on walking tours near the exhibition site. These apparitions may also be stumbled upon as ‘Points of Interest’ by passersby, the locations visited long after by spirits of a distant valley.

“From the Valley of the Deer” is a 2013 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence website. It was funded by the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHY

Jillian McDonald is a Canadian artist who divides her time between New York and Canada. She is an Associate Professor of Art at Pace University. She is hopelessly in love with northern places, snow, fog, and the ocean, and since 2006 has watched a healthy amount of horror films. She spent much of the past year living and working in Northeastern Scotland.

Solo shows and projects include the Esker Foundation in Calgary; Moti Hasson Gallery, Jack the Pelican Presents, and vertexList in New York; The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery and Rosenthal Gallery in San Francisco; Hallwalls in Buffalo; La Sala Narañja in Valencia, Spain; and YYZ in Toronto. Her work has been included in group exhibitions and festivals at The Chelsea Museum and The Whitney Museum’s Artport in New York; The Edith Russ Haus for Media Art in Oldenburg, Germany; MMOCA in Madison, Wisconsin; Onsite at OCADU and YYZ Gallery in Toronto; The International Biennial of Contemporary Art in Mérida, Venezuela; The Sundance Film Festival in Utah; La Biennale de Montréal; and the Centre d’Art Contemporain de Basse-Normandie in Caen, France.

Her work was the subject of a 2013 radio documentary by Paul Kennedy on CBC’s IDEAS. It has been reviewed in The New York Times, Art Papers, The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, Border Crossings, and The Village Voice, among others. A discussion of her work appears in several books including Better Off Dead, edited by Sarah Juliet Lauro and Stalking by Bran Nicol.

McDonald has received grants and commissions from The New York Foundation for the Arts, The Canada Council for the Arts, Soil New Media, Turbulence.org, The Verizon Foundation, The New York State Council on the Arts, The Experimental Television Center, and Pace University. She lectures regularly about her work and has attended numerous residencies including The Headlands Center for the Arts in California, Lilith Performance Studio in Sweden, The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Workspace Program in New York, The Western Front in Vancouver, and The Banff Centre for the Arts in Alberta. In 2012 she represented Canada at the Glenfiddich international residency in Dufftown, Scotland.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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Greater Thames Marshes, Nature Improvement Area Commission Opportunity

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

The project provides a unique opportunity with much of the land within Hadleigh Country Park being designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest as it is a haven for around 1,300 species of wildlife including the shrill carder bee, the emerald damselfly and the weevil hunting wasp. The local environment also supports dark-bellied Brent geese.

Public Art Online Commissions – Greater Thames Marshes, Nature Improvement Area Commission Opportunity.

(Deadline was 3 March 2014)

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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The Big Melt: Saving Archeological Treasures Exposed by Melting Glaciers

This post comes to you from Cultura21

The race to find, and save, ancient artifacts emerging from glaciers and ice patches in a warming world

By ANDREW CURRY

Archaeologists in Norway space themselves out to walk along ground newly exposed by the melting edges of an ice patch. Eyes firmly on the ground, they are on the lookout for artifacts that have spent thousands of years locked in ice.

“The fortuitous discovery of the Bronze Age shoe helped the local?heritage management office push for an organized rescue program to?locate, assess, and search dozens of sites in the mountains of?Oppland. It’s an effort that combines archaeology with high-tech?mapping, glaciology, climate science, and history. When conditions are?right, it’s as simple as picking the past up off the ground. [..]

In Scandinavia and beyond, the booming field of glacier and ice patch?archaeology represents both an opportunity and a crisis. On one hand,?it exposes artifacts and sites that have been preserved in ice for?millennia, offering archaeologists a chance to study them. On the?other hand, from the moment the ice at such sites melts, the pressure?to find, document, and conserve the exposed artifacts is tremendous.?’The next 50 years will be decisive,’ says Albert Hafner, an?archaeologist at the University of Bern who has excavated melting?sites in the Alps. ‘If you don’t do it now they will be lost.’”

Find the full article here.

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Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Could an artist do this?

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Recycling of Gully Waste and General Road Construction Materials in South Lanarkshire

The Council requires to procure services for the acceptance and subsequent recycling of gully waste and road construction materials produced from the works of South Lanarkshire Council’s Roads and Transportation Services.

Roads and Transportation Services operates four Depots as follows:-

  • Carnwath Depot – ML11 8LR
  • Lesmahagow – ML11 0DZ
  • East Kilbride – G74 5HA
  • Larkhall – ML9 2GA

The waste materials for /recycling will be transported by South Lanarkshire Council to the Contractor’s facility. Where required, the Contractor will also provide an uplift service, transporting waste road construction materials from Council Depots to its recycling facility.

The waste is composed as follows:-

Category A:- Materials including vegetation, timber, plastic and other processed or manufactured materials. Waste Category 17-01-01, 17-01-02, 17-01-03, 17-01-07, 17-03-02, 17-05-04 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Category B:- Materials including rock, crushed rock, blaes, concrete, metal, soil, subsoil, and other excavated materials. Waste Category 17-01-01, 17-01-02, 17-01-03, 17-01-07, 17-03-02, 17-05-04 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Gully waste:- Waste Category 20 03 03 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Motor and lorry tyres: Waste Category 16 01 03 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

Bitumen emulsion:- Bitumen emulsion tack coat. Waste Category 08 04 16 as defined by Article 1(a) of Directive 75/442/EEC on waste and Article 1(4) of Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste.

CPV: 90500000, 90514000.

View Notice – Public Contracts Scotland.

EcoArtScotland wonders about this, not particularly because of the land art tradition, but more from an ecological art perspective.  We’d cite Betty Beaumont’s Ocean Landmark which involved using 500 tons of coal waste processed into 17,000 coal fly ash blocks and then deposited into the ocean to create a new marine environment off Fire Island in the North East United States.

EcoArtScotland suspects that there are innovative ways to dispose of this material and enhance biodiversity or storm water management or something we can’t even imagine.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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Australia: American environmental artist featured at Sustainable Living Festival

This post comes to you from Culture|Futures

Australia: American environmental artist featured at Sustainable Living Festival

The internationally renowned eco-artist and photographer Chris Jordan constructed a major artwork for the Sustainable Living Festival in Melbourne, Australia, from 11 to 16 February 2014, and he also gave presentations and talks.

chris-jordan_sinking-ship

Chris Jordan explores themes of consumption, waste, environmentalism, ecology and use of art for communication. His work has been described as aesthetically beautiful, mind-boggling and thought-provoking.

Citizens of Melbourne were encouraged to bring their old mobiles to Federation Square on 11 February to be part of his installation.

slf_chris-jordan

» Chris Jordan’s home page: www.chrisjordan.com

» More information about arts-related events during the Sustainable Living Festival: www.slf.org.au/festival14

Chris Jordan’s activities at the festival in Melbourne

Public Forum
Saturday 15 February at 1pm
Free entry
Federation Square, Melbourne, Australia

Installation
11-16 February
Swanston St Forecourt
Federation Square, Melbourne, Australia

Help Create an Eco-Artwork
Wednesday 12 February 2014 (10am-12pm & 12pm-2pm)
Federation Square, Melbourne

Be inspired by internationally renowned eco-artist Chris Jordan as he constructs a major artwork for MobileMuster at Sustainable Living Festival.

Students and teachers will be able to join Chris as he arranges 8,000 old and unused mobile phones into a feature artwork on mobile phone recycling. They will hear from the artist about how he creates his environmental artworks which have been described as aesthetically beautiful, mind-boggling, and thought-provoking. This unique session will challenge students to consider how art can be used to communicate how we think about sustainability. Schools will be provided with learning resources on the artist which can be used as an extension or homework activity.

SLF Education Day Forum & Workshop 
Friday 14 February 2014, 10am-2pm
Federation Square, Melbourne, Australia

slf_chris-jordan-bookAs part of SLF Education Day activities students heard a keynote presentation from Chris Jordan and participated in a hands-on workshop. Widely recognised for his stunning environmental art yet also a captivating speaker, Chris Jordan, in his keynote presentation, exploree themes of consumption, waste, environmentalism, use of art for communicating messages and ecology.

The workshop offered students the chance to learn about the inside of a mobile phone and what can be recycled. They were given expert advice, tools and workspaces to dismantle old mobile phones and learn about the resources that can be recovered. They separated the phone components and identified what materials and elements are used in the mobile phone and how they can be recovered in the recycling process. MobileMuster provided learning resources to that can be taken back to school and used as extensions or homework activity to complement the workshop and further the discussion on the life cycle of a mobile phone.

Students were also able to view the large scale artwork created by Chris Jorda

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Culture|Futures is an international collaboration of organizations and individuals who are concerned with shaping and delivering a proactive cultural agenda to support the necessary transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.

The Cultural sector that we refer to is an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, inter-genre collaboration, which encompasses policy-making, intercultural dialogue/cultural relations, creative cities/cultural planning, creative industries and research and development. It is those decision-makers and practitioners who can reach people in a direct way, through diverse messages and mediums.

Affecting the thinking and behaviour of people and communities is about the dissemination of stories which will profoundly impact cultural values, beliefs and thereby actions. The stories can open people’s eyes to a way of thinking that has not been considered before, challenge a preconceived notion of the past, or a vision of the future that had not been envisioned as possible. As a sector which is viewed as imbued with creativity and cultural values, rather than purely financial motivations, the cultural sector’s stories maintain the trust of people and society.

Go toThis post comes to you from Culture|Futures

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Strange Weather

This post comes from Chantal Bilodeau’s Artists and Climate Change Blog

Science Gallery Strange Weather

Dublin’s amazing Science Gallery was accepting proposals for its summer 2014 exhibition STRANGE WEATHER. The deadline for submitting proposals expired at 12 midnight on Valentines Day, 14 February 2014.  According to the submission guidelines, the curators — CoClimate and Science Gallery’s  Michael John Gorman — will bring together meteorologists, artists, climate scientists and designers in order to inform, intrigue, provoke dialogue and engage audiences directly, making the complex and emotional topic of extreme weather and climate change more relevant to everyday experiences.  This is a recurring topic here on the Artists and Climate Change site.  STRANGE WEATHER promises to challenge audiences with novel visions of a global culture adapting to extreme weather.  Good luck!

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Artists and Climate Change is a blog by playwright Chantal Bilodeau that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to Chantal Bilodeau’s Artists and Climate Change Blog

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