Yearly Archives: 2013

Superhero Clubhouse and Matchboxarts in association with Chez Bushwick present MARS (a play about mining)

uqze_MARSlogo2013FacebookcoverphotoMarch 7-9, 7:30pm

Center for Performance Research (CPR)

Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Displaced Appalachians resettled on Mars face a familiar dilemma when their leader initiates a questionable mining operation. The sixth in our Planet Play series, MARS is a dance-theater event featuring live music, graphic art and an original story inspired by the history of Appalachian coal mining.

MARS (a play about mining)
adapted from the graphic novel MARS! by  Tom Coiner
Choreography by Adam H. Weinert
Music by Adam Miller
Graphic Art by Kristy Caldwell with assistance from Clay Rodery and Ray Jones
Stage & Costume Design by R.B. Schlather
Stage Management/Assistant Direction by Alessandra Calabi
Dramaturgy by Megan McClain

Directed by Jeremy Pickard

Created & Performed by

Javier Baca
Nathaniel Bausch-Gould
Rosie Dupont
Aba Kiser
Logan Kruger
Dan Lawrence*
Keisuke Matsuno
Adam Miller
Manelich Minniefee
Jeremy Pickard
Davon Rainey
J.P. Schlegel
Adam H. Weinert

*appearing courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association

marslogoMust human progress always end in destruction?  What are the risks we will take to restore our home? Contemporary politics and childhood fantasies come crashing together in this unique event inspired the history of Appalachian coal mining.  Led by choreographer Adam H. Weinert, director Jeremy Pickard and composer Adam Miller, MARS features original dance, live music, graphic art and a strong ensemble of cross-disciplinary performers. Our technology is opening new frontiers… and new mines. We can go to Mars, hold the internet in our palm… and blow the tops off America’s oldest mountains. The controversies and paradoxes of mining have never been more relevant. In MARS, we explore these topics in our own unique way, and invite you to join in the adventure and the conversation.

Economics of Happiness Conference 2013

This post comes to you from Cultura21

March 15-17, 2013 – Byron Bay, Australia

The not-for-profit organization ISEC (International Society for Ecology and Culture) is, after the success of the first conference held last March in Berkeley, California, hosting the second international Economics of Happiness Conference in Australia. The conference is an annual event of the global grassroots movement whose mission is to promote systemic solutions to today’s environmental, social and economic crises led by ISEC, which has also led to the production of the corresponding documentary in 2011(trailer included in this post).

The interactive program will consist of plenary sessions, workshops, and social and creative time, participants will have a rare opportunity to learn from and share with some of the foremost leaders in the worldwide localization movement. The conference also offers the chance to make new connections, build on current projects and find new inspiration.

The list of speakers includes: Vandana Shiva, Bill McKibben, Donnie Maclurcan, Michael Shuman and Helena Norberg-Hodge.

For more information, the full list of speakers and to register, visit theeconomicsofhappiness.org

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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14 ways to look at Scotland

This post comes to you from Ashden Directory

from The Bothy Project

from The Bothy Project

Wallace Heim writes: The Year of Natural Scotland, an initiative led by the Scottish government, connects the country’s natural diversity and its artistic life. Their economic incentive is to develop tourism and the events industries. The means to do this include 14 arts projects across every region of Scotland.

The projects, supported by Creative Scotland and Scottish Natural Heritage, will share £500,000 to create events, poetry, walks, films and installations that combine the country’s natural and cultural life.

An outline of the projects shows their geographic and artistic diversity. The longer list of organisations, groups and communities that are collaborating on each project shows the social reach of this economic programme.

  • NVA presents Island Drift, a lighting and photographic project on the islands of Loch Lomond.
  • Scotland’s Botanic Gardens in Edinburgh, Argyll, the Borders and Dumfries & Galloway will develop writing and walking residencies.
  • Wide Open and Crichton Carbon Centre, Spring Fling and the Stove will present an International Environmental Arts Festival based on themes of land and energy.
  • Walking a Line by Dunbar North Light Arts is a year-long site-specific project of walking, marking and recording in the environment.
  • Sound Out@Seven Lochs will compose music and soundscapes for a new planned wetland park near Glasgow.
  • Smallpetitklein Dance Company will present an outdoor event with professional and non-professional dancers around the Tentsmuir Nature Reserve.
  • Tabula Rasa will bring together artists, environmentalists and people working on the River Tweed.
  • Tiny Geographies, by composer and television director Chris Dooks, will gather local stories and music for festivals in Aberdeenshire and Deeside.
  • For Natural Bennachie, three artists will work with scientists to celebrate the heritage of this north-eastern landmark.
  • My Place in the Natural World will involve young people in Aberdeen and creative digital media.
  • The Highland Print Studio and Cape Farewell will deliver the exhibition Sexy Peat celebrating the Lewis blanket bog.
  • Composers Inge Thomson and Lise Sinclair will create Da Fishing Hands, a project featuring song about Fair Isle’s fishing grounds and their changing and sustainable use.
  • Sweeny’s Bothy / Bothan Shuibhne is an off-grid retreat for artists, writers and the public, involving events, walks, residencies reflecting on wild nature and contemporary culture.
  • In addition to these projects, in the Autumn, the Year of Natural Scotland will host a major conference, ‘Reading the Landscape’ exploring the representation, mis-representation, imagining and re-imagining of nature in Scotland.

“ashdenizen blog and twitter are consistently among the best sources for information and reflection on developments in the field of arts and climate change in the UK” (2020 Network)

ashdenizen is edited by Robert Butler, and is the blog associated with the Ashden Directory, a website focusing on environment and performance.
The Ashden Directory is edited by Robert Butler and Wallace Heim, with associate editor Kellie Gutman. The Directory includes features, interviews, news, a timeline and a database of ecologically – themed productions since 1893 in the United Kingdom. Our own projects include ‘New Metaphors for Sustainability’, ‘Flowers Onstage’ and ‘Six ways to look at climate change and theatre’.

The Directory has been live since 2000.

Go to The Ashden Directory

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Mark Dion at Museum Het Domein

This post comes to you from Cultura21

museum-het-domeinThe Macabre Treasury

January 20–May 5, 2013 – Museum Het Domein – Sittard, Netherlands

“Increasingly, my work has become macabre and laced with dusky pessimism. Early on I believed that ecological calamity could be averted by awareness. If people knew about issues like the loss of biodiversity or global warming, they would act so as to halt the problem. (…) Now, I just don’t believe that it will all work out. Not that there will be a single great catastrophe, but rather the world will slowly become less biological diverse, more impoverished, an uglier, less remarkable place to live. (…) Ozone holes, burning rainforests, ecological wars, species extinction, landfill landscapes will become fantastic theatre, a spectacle of ecosystem collapse. (…) Coming soon—the planet earth becoming a crummier place, and like numerous other rude spectators, it’s hard for me to keep my mouth closed during the show.”
–Mark Dion, unpublished manuscript, 2001

Macabre Treasury an exhibition by the American artist Mark Dion, internationally acclaimed to be a prominent contemporary artist, is Dion´s first solo museum exhibition in the Netherlands since fifteen years. He is playing a pioneering role with his work, which focuses on ecological issues and our perception of nature. Dion’s work examines the ways in which dominant ideologies and public institutions like museums shape our understanding of history, the ways we accumulate knowledge, and how we regard the natural world. Appropriating archaeological and other scientific methods of collecting, ordering, and exhibiting objects, Dion creates works that question the distinctions between “objective” (“rational”) scientific methods and “subjective” (“irrational”) influences. The artist’s spectacular and often fantastical curiosity cabinets, modeled on Wunderkabinetts of the sixteenth century, are notable for their atypical orderings of objects and specimens. By locating the roots of environmental politics and public policy in the construction of knowledge about nature, Mark Dion questions the authoritative role of the scientific voice in contemporary society.

For The Macabre Treasury, Dion will transform Museum Het Domein’s contemporary art wing into a giant Wunderkabinett. The exhibition will be divided into various departments of a fictional museum. Dion’s macabre treasure chamber will thus include amongst others Departments of Zoology and Archeology, a Bureau of Museums and the Culture of Collections, a Hunting Salon, aCinematheque and a Cabinet of Mystery. As part of the exhibition of his own work, the artist will present a selection of objects from Museum Het Domein’s historical collection and from other local museums and archives. The objects vary from local archeological findings to an eleventh-century tree-trunk coffin with a female skeleton. As is the case with all of Dion’s presentations, the exhibition in Het Domein can be considered an attempt to restore something of our earlier notion of the universal museum with its hybrid combinations of different disciplines and fields of knowledge. Newly inciting the curiosity of the museum-goer is just as essential. The artist once proclaimed that museums should be restored to their roles as “powder kegs of the imagination.”

For more information and visuals, visit the museums homepage.

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Live Dancing Archive at The Kitchen

This post comes to you from Cultura21

From February 14 – 23The Kitchen and iLAND, Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Art, Nature and Dance, present the New York premiere of dancer and choreographer Jennifer Monson’s Live Dancing Archive, a visceral exploration of the dancing body as physical archive of experience and place.

The piece, which marks Monson’s return to The Kitchen after 15 years, comprises Monson’s first-ever evening-length solo performance, a video installation by Robin Vachal and an online archive. Performances will take place Thursdays through Saturdays, February 14 – 23 at 8:00 pm while the full video installation will be on view in the theatre Tuesday through Friday, 12–6pm and Saturday, 11am–6pm from February 15–23.

The video installation plays as repeating 4-hour loop with viewers invited to view to drop-in at any time for any length of time. Although the video can be viewed on it’s own, it was made in conversation with the performance and on-line archive. A daily viewing schedule for the video will be available at the Kitchen and online starting February 14th.

Monson’s new work proposes that the body has the possibility of archiving and revisiting multiple scales of experience. Specifically, Monson looks at how experiences of environment and ecological dependencies are registered through physical movement. Live Dancing Archive negotiates and explores what a queer ecology might offer for dancing bodies and rapidly shifting conceptions of place. Furthermore, the piece looks at how Monson’s navigation of her own queer, feminist and animal-like body has shaped relationships to cultural and social phenomena.

For more information, visit thekitchen.org.

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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[UN]NATURAL LIMITS – Austrian Cultural Forum New York

This post comes to you from Cultura21

Jan 23 – April 1, 2013

Austrian Cultural Forum New York 11 East 52nd Street – New York, NY 10022

Artists: Desire Machine Collective, Thomas Hirschhorn, Mathias Kessler, Superflex, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Lois Weinberger
Curated by Dieter Buchhart & Arnaud Gerspacher
Curatorial Advisor: Mathias Kessler

The new international group exhibition [UN]NATURAL LIMITS, which opened on January 22nd, gathers together different artistic reactions to the alienating effects of the unfettered global exploitation of resources, and offers insight into the denial and myopia of current political responses to what increasingly appears to be a perpetual crisis.
It focuses on the environmental relays sent back in response to our human activities (or failures to act), while giving voice to various groups, thinkers, and artists who seek to interrupt narcissistic and destructive self-involvements in society.

The exhibition, which was commissioned by the Austrian Cultural Forum’s director Andreas Stadler and curated by the Viennese-New York team of Dieter Buchhart and Arnaud Gerspacher, maintains a deep ambiguity towards the modernist legacies of endless expansion and selective prosperity, as our social and political systems slowly begin to confront the limits of growth and sustainability. Each artist or collective poses a challenge to the perceived limits that condition our understanding of the world: on the one hand, the limited prospect for action, compassion, and change, while on the other, the limitless drive for resources and capital in all its forms. A reversal is necessary: it is compassion that should be limitless.

The show will include an installation by Swiss artist Thomas Hirschhorn titled Resistance-Subjecter (2011), which was first shown as part of his Crystal of Resistance at the Venice Biennial 2011. The bodies of the eight mannequins have seemingly been infested and corroded by 1 million year-old crystals. We are left to guess whether the crystals were produced in the body and stand for a material resisting cultural, economic, social, ecological, and aesthetical habits, or whether the body was produced by the crystals, now hosting them in order to resist the jaded times we live in.

Austrian artist Lois Weinberger’s Invasion (2005/2011) also plays with the limits of the organic and inorganic. The installation consists of a group of mushrooms that climb, protrude, and seem to grow from the Austrian Cultural Forum’s gallery walls. The work is a striking confluence of nature and artificiality, though the limits between the natural and unnatural are not as clear as they may first appear: the walls themselves were once organic growths in a forest and the artificial lighting is itself produced by natural sources of energy.

Equally engaged in uncovering the often-arbitrary limits between ecology and the economic functioning of the urban landscape, Mierle Laderman Ukeles has been committed to interrogating the social role of art within these processes. Her Manifesto for Maintenance Art 1969! (1969) states that art should be concerned with maintaining life, its systems and environments. In her yearlong performance documented in Touch Sanitation Performance (1977-80), Ukeles shook hands with 8,500 sanitation employees, while sharing and documenting their stories, and thereby drawing attention to the ecological underbelly of New York City and its often socially stigmatized workers.

In Experience Climate Change As… (2009), the Danish collective Superflex advertises a series of hypnosis sessions offered in conjunction with international global climate change summits. The first one took place in 2009 at the UN Global Climate Summit in Copenhagen, and future events are planned through the year 2050. These hypnosis sessions allow participants to experience climate change as a specific animal, in a relatively playful gesture that nevertheless points to the serious relationship between the natural limits of global ecosystems and the seemingly limitless capacity of world powers to defer action due to realpolitik and economic reasons.

The rapacious capacity to excavate natural sites is documented by Mathias Kessler in his piece,Jarrells Cemetery, N37o53.96’ W81o34.71’. Eunice Mountain. West Virginia. (2012). The artist traveled to a commercial surface mining site in West Virginia to document the operation and the local stories mourning the lost landscape, the political situation, and the area’s history. Verbal accounts are audible to visitors outside the gallery, before they are confronted inside by a massive wallpaper depicting the carved out hillsides which appear overwhelmingly dry and diseased. In serious irony, the only remnant and survivor in an otherwise lifeless scene is a cemetery, now even more cut-off from the living.

Finally, [UN]NATURAL LIMITS includes a documentation of Periferry – An incomplete Balance Sheet (2013), a nomadic space for hybrid art practices mounted and maintained by Desire Machine Collective. Located on a ferry barge on the Brahmaputra River in India, this project provides a space for experimentation and new media approaches, public and community arts, which are relevant to immediate local concerns and aim at the empowerment of the community and reclaiming the public space, while at the same time connecting with the global.

For more information, visit acfny.org

Reposted from eflux newsletter

Cultura21 is a transversal, translocal network, constituted of an international level grounded in several Cultura21 organizations around the world.

Cultura21′s international network, launched in April 2007, offers the online and offline platform for exchanges and mutual learning among its members.

The activities of Cultura21 at the international level are coordinated by a team representing the different Cultura21 organizations worldwide, and currently constituted of:

– Sacha Kagan (based in Lüneburg, Germany) and Rana Öztürk (based in Berlin, Germany)
– Oleg Koefoed and Kajsa Paludan (both based in Copenhagen, Denmark)
– Hans Dieleman (based in Mexico-City, Mexico)
– Francesca Cozzolino and David Knaute (both based in Paris, France)

Cultura21 is not only an informal network. Its strength and vitality relies upon the activities of several organizations around the world which are sharing the vision and mission of Cultura21

Go to Cultura21

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Energization Survey

energization_black

ABOUT ME

My name is Maddalena and I am a Ph.D. student of Iuav University of Venice (Italy).  I am an industrial and interaction designer with a passion for theatre and this is why I started my research. If you are interested in knowing more information about me: www.maddalenadesign.it

Energization is a project I started last year to investigate how perceptions and imagery about energy is going to change  in the context of performing arts and, above all, buildings for theatre. At the moment, I am inviting people to join the debate and I am collecting information.

FIRST STEP: THEATRE WORKERS QUESTIONNAIRE

To start knowing more about you I would like to kindly invite you to answer an on-line questionnaire. You can decide to answer anonymously or you can insert your name, as you prefer.  THEATRE WORKERS questionnaire covers different specific areas so, if you don’t know some information  because it is not prerogative of your profession, really don’t worry  (it is not an exam and most of time  people don’t know some information I am requesting), simply skip and go to next question.

DATA COLLECTION

The data I am collecting are going to be used only for study purposes related to my research.  The results of the whole questionnaire will be reported as aggregated data in my Ph.D. thesis  or other form of scientific documentations (such as for example Energization’s website: www.maddalenadesign.it/ energization) For any suggestion, thought and reflection or question, or if you are interested in receiving a copy of the results of this study (when ready), feel free to contact me at maddalena@maddalenadesign.it

WHAT TO DO

When you have 15-20 minutes of time ;):

  1. go to this webpage: http://www.maddalenadesign.it/energization/survey/
  2. click on “SURVEY FOR THEATRE WORKERS (people that works in the field of performing arts)”
  3. write the password: teatroenergia26
  4. PLEASE BE CAREFUL YOU WILL BE ASKED TO CLICK THE “SUBMIT SURVEY” BUTTON 2 TIMES (otherwise I will not receive you answers)

 

Thank you so much,

kind regards

Maddalena

Shifting Baselines exhibition close Feb. 6th, 2013

This post comes to you from EcoArtSpace

The Santa Fe Art Institute has extended Shifting Baselines with installations by Cynthia Hooper and Hugh Pocock through Feb. 6th, 2013. Here is a sneak peak of the exhibition:


ecoartapace ecoartspace is a nonprofit platform providing opportunities for artists who address the human/nature relationship in the visual arts. Since 1999 they have collaborated with over 150 organizations to produce more than 40 exhibitions, 100 programs, working with 400 + artists in 15 states nationally and 8 countries internationally. Currently they are developing a media archive of video interviews with artists and collection of exhibitions ephemera for research purposes. Patricia Watts is founder and west coast curator. Amy Lipton is east coast curator and director of the ecoartspace NYC project room.

A project of the Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs since 1999

Go to EcoArtSpace

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Intersection for the Arts Presents: By–­product Becomes Product

By-product Becomes Product Press Release FinalIMAGE: Christine Lee, A Product’s By-­‐product, a By-­‐product’s Product (detail of installation), scrap wood and adhesive-­‐free sawdust composite boards, 2011

An innovative cross-­‐disciplinary project using excess wood waste to explore safer alternatives to working with toxic material. Featuring work by Russell Baldon, Julia Goodman, Barbara Holmes, Christine Lee, Scott Oliver, and Imin Yeh.

Opening Reception: Wednesday February 6, 2013, 7–9pm, FREE

Members VIP Reception: Wednesday February 6, 2013, 6–7pm, RSVP ryan@theintersection.org

Gallery & Community Hours: Tuesdays – Saturdays, 12–6pm, FREE

Intersection for  the  Arts

925 Mission Street (5th)

San Francisco, CA 94103      

www.theintersection.org  |  (415)626-­2787    

Intersection for the Arts presents By-­‐product Becomes Product, an innovative cross-­‐disciplinary project involving lead artist Christine    Lee (sculpture, furniture), U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Products Laboratory (FPL, the country’s leading wood research institute) Research EngineerJohn  F.    Hunt, and five artists who use wood as their main material: Russell  Baldon (sculpture, furniture), Julia  Goodman (paper, sculpture), Barbara  Holmes (sculpture, furniture), Scott  Oliver    (sculpture, public art), and Imin  Yeh (printmaker). Christine Lee’s practice is characterized by an objective to reveal the latent potential of disregarded material.  Influenced by the prevalent theories and practices of materials reclamation, resource conservation, and recycling in contemporary art, Lee is proposing an innovative solution to working with composite wood boards that are free of toxic adhesives and binders, effectively utilizing excess waste, offering a safer alternative to readily available plywood and medium-­‐density fiberboard (commonly called MDF), and creating value to a common, abundant by-­‐product for use by a range of artistic and industrial disciplines.  The exhibition will showcase a broad range of conceptual and aesthetic styles, demonstrating diversity of construction techniques, and blurring boundaries between fine art, craft, industrial design, and interactive installation. By-­‐product Becomes Product embodies Intersection’s commitment to supporting innovative thought that facilitates positive change by working with an artist who has proactively developed material that is sustainable, non-­‐toxic, and highly usable in artistic, craft, and industrial fields by manifesting scientific and engineering expertise into real-­‐world applications.

The genesis for this project came when Lee was a Resident Artist at the University of Wisconsin–Madison  Art Department’s Wood Program in 2010.  Already concerned about the health effects of working with commonly available composite wood panels such as MDF, particle board, and certain plywoods, she wanted to explore alternative approaches to material use and investigate material choices that could establish a healthier creative practice during her residency. Formaldehyde resins and glues are commonly used to bind together both plywood and MDF, and testing has consistently revealed that these wood boards emit urea-­‐formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for months after manufacture, let alone the harmful, residual particles created from cutting the boards. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency classified urea-­‐ formaldehyde as a “probable human carcinogen” as early as 1987.  During her residency, Lee worked with a supply of excess, post-­‐industrial wood donated from a local millwork company.  Being accountable for even more waste, Lee collected the sawdust she generated and worked with FPL Research Engineer John F. Hunt to create test panels with the sawdust supply, in essence producing usable material out of typically discarded by-­‐product. Working at the FPL since 1979, Hunt has been committed to discovering innovative ways to utilize wood waste with cutting-­‐edge technology and manufacturing methods. Building upon Hunt’s extensive research knowledge on molded fiber products and recycling paper into structural products, Lee and Hunt used various forming processes to create sawdust composite boards exhibiting properties similar to current manufactured wood boards such as MDF. These new boards, however, do not contain formaldehyde-­‐based resins or other toxic adhesives, and are entirely biodegradable and recyclable. Given that The Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products Act was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Obama in 2010 to regulate formaldehyde omissions, this project is both timely and relevant to larger social concerns. By-­‐product Becomes Product is supported in part by the San Francisco Arts Commission Cultural Equity Grants program.

Established in 1965, Intersection is widely considered to be one of the most vital cultural centers on the West Coast. Intersection recently forged a set of unique cross-­‐sector partnerships rooted in a shared belief that art and creativity realized through meaningful, inclusive, and collaborative places fuels vibrancy and facilitates positive change. The change the world needs now happens when we are outside of our silos – colliding with complex experiences, grappling with new metaphors, understanding people who are different than us, finding new ways to communicate and problem solve.  Through our unique partnership, we are collaborating on The 5M Project. Led by Forest City, The 5M Project is a 4-­‐acre multi-­‐phase, mixed-­‐use development project located at the intersection of several distinct neighborhoods in downtown San Francisco.  With 5M, we are prototyping the next generation of urban development that embraces diversity of thought, life experience, and culture as essential to positive economic and social change in our neighborhoods. 5M proposes that art – creative collaboration, placemaking, and problem solving – builds understanding and community, celebrates and mobilizes neighborhood assets, and drives inclusive change.

About the participating artists in By-­product Becomes Product:

Lead artist CHRISTINE  LEE (www.missleelee.com) is a sculptor, furniture maker, and installation artist whose creative practice is characterized by an objective to reveal the latent potential of disregarded material. She received her MFA from San Diego State University in 2007 and has exhibited her work in group exhibitions locally at the Museum of Craft and Design, Headlands Center for the Arts, Invisible Venue, Intersection for the Arts, Recology SF, and San Francisco State University, and in group exhibitions nationally at the Racine Art Museum (Racine, WI), The Museum of Arts and Design (New York, NY), Art Produce Gallery (San Diego, CA), and Fuller Craft Museum (Brockton, MA). She has been a visiting resident artist at the ASU Art Museum (Tempe, AZ), Anderson Ranch Arts Center (Snowmass Village, CO), and an Artist in Residence at the University of Wisconsin-­‐Madison, Stone Quarry Hill Art Park (Cazenovia, NY), Purchase College (Purchase, NY), and Recology SF.  She has taught at ASU, California College of the Arts, and San Diego State University and also worked as a studio assistant for new media artist Jim Campbell and woodworker Wendy Maruyama.  She has presented lectures and participated on panel discussions at the ASU Art Museum, Yale University, Stanford University, Maine College of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, and the University of Arkansas-­‐Little Rock.

RUSSELL  BALDON (www.russellbaldon.posterous.com) is a sculptor and furniture maker who was born and raised in California. He was a partner in his family’s wooden toy business before moving to San Francisco in 1984. After receiving his BFA in Wood/Furniture from the California College of Arts and Crafts in 1992 and his MFA in Wood/Furniture from San Diego State University in 1998, he studied and worked with some of the country’s leading studio furniture makers. In 1999, he helped to form a cooperative studio in Alameda, CA, where members pursue many commissioned and speculative furniture and sculptural works in a 5,000-­‐square-­‐foot wood and metal shop. Since 2002 Baldon has taught in the Furniture Program at CCA, and has served as chair of the program since 2009. He also has had the honor of teaching at Laney College’s Wood Technology Program (Oakland, CA), Haystack School of Craft (Deer Isle, ME), Penland School of Crafts (Spruce Pine, NC), San Diego State University, and the Oregon College of Arts and Crafts (Portland, OR).  His work has been included in group exhibitions locally at LIMN Gallery, Fort Mason, and Museum of Craft and Folk Art, and in group exhibitions nationally at Shoshana Wayne Gallery (Santa Monica, CA), Lexington Art League (Lexington, KY), and Society of Arts and Crafts (Boston, MA).    

JULIA  GOODMAN (www.jagoodman.com) is a papermaker and sculptor who received her MFA from the California College of the Arts in 2009, after studying studio arts at Santa Monica College from 2004–2007 and earning her BA in International Relations  and Peace and Justice Stuides at Tufts University in 2001.  Her work has been included in exhibitions locally at Rena Bransten Gallery, Performance Art Institute, ProArts Gallery, Varnish Art Gallery, Intersection for the Arts, Richmond Art Center, Lincart, Triple Base, and the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, and in group exhibitions nationally at Project 4 (Washington, DC), Dieu Donne (New York, NY), Highways Performance Art Space (Santa Monica, CA), and Long Beach Arts (Long Beach, CA).  She was awarded a J.B. Blunk Artist Residency (Inverness, CA), completed a studio internship at Dieu Donné Papermill Inc. (New York, NY) and a residency in Kona, HI, and is a 2012 resident artist at Recology SF.  She not only casts paper in the traditional method, but pushes the medium into sculptural form.  In her recent body of work, she has been carving into MDF to create molds with which to cast paper pulp in a process residing between sculpture and printmaking.

BARBARA  HOLMES (www.barbaraholmes.com) is a sculptor and furniture maker who received her MFA from San Diego State University in 2002 and her BFA from Brigham Young University in 1993.  Her work has been included in group exhibitions locally at Headlands Center for the Arts, Museum of Craft and Design, Museum of Craft and Folk Art, Root Division, Catherine Clark Gallery, Compound Gallery, and LIMN Gallery, and in group exhibitions nationally at the Fuller Craft Museum (Brockton, MA), Oceanside Museum of Art (Oceanside, CA), Divan Gallery (La Jolla, CA), Kohler Arts Center (Sheboygan, WI), and Sushi Art Space (San Diego, CA).  She has been awarded Artist Residencies at Anderson Ranch Arts Center (Snowmass Village, CO), Recology SF, and Capital City Arts Initiative at St. Mary’s Art Center (Virginia City, NV), and has work in the permanent collection at SFMOMA. She has taught at the University of Wisconsin-­‐Madison, San Diego State University, Southwestern College, Mira Costa College, and currently at CCA. Her practice has focused on the reclamation and creative reuse of discarded construction material.

JOHN  F. HUNT (www.fpl.fs.fed.us)  is a Research Mechanical Engineer who has been working at the country’s leading wood research institute, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, WI, since 1979.  His research focuses on developing new ways to improve wood fiber products with cutting edge technology and production methods. Understanding the fundamental properties of wood fibers, he has extensive research background knowledge on molded fiber products and recycling paper into structural products, and is passionately committed to finding innovative ways to use wood waste. His research background knowledge includes molded fiber products, Spaceboard, Gridcore, wet-­‐formed fiberboard manufacturing, recycling paper into structural products, press drying paper, fiberglass in fiberboard, honeycomb paper cores and sandwich construction, veneer peeling, and laminated paper.  He also works on three-­‐dimensional modeling of paper laminates, composites, small diameter utilization through laminated structural lumber, and whole tree fiberization.

SCOTT  OLIVER’s (www.scottoliverworks.com) diverse practice explores our entangled relationship with objects and materiality through, what he calls, “poetic repurposing.” His work has taken many forms including in-­‐home sculptural interventions, a symbiotic restaurant, a collection of discarded LPs, an elaborate parlor game with students, and most recently, a multi-­‐faceted public project at Lake Merritt in Oakland. He is also a maker of objects, and while he does not claim any particular medium his background in design and woodworking are often evident in his work. He holds a BFA (1994) in Graphic Design and an MFA (2005) in Wood/Furniture from California College of the Arts. His work has been shown widely in the Bay Area at the deYoung Art Center, San Jose Institute for Contemporary Art, Triple Base, Oakland Museum, Johansson Projects, Southern Exposure, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, SF Arts Commission Gallery, Mission 17, and Rena Bransten Gallery; and nationally at Grounds for Sculpture (Hamilton, NJ), Pulliam Deffenbaugh Gallery (Portland, OR), and UCLA.  He has received awards and grants for his work from the East Bay Community Foundation, Center for Cultural Innovation, the City of Oakland, and Southern Exposure. He was an artist in residence at Headlands Center for the Arts in 2009 and at Recology SF in 2007. He has taught at the California College of the Arts and UC Berkeley. He currently lives and works in Fort Bragg, CA with his wife and their son.    

IMIN  YEH (www.iminyeh.info)  attended the University of Wisconsin-­‐Madison receiving a Bachelors of Art and Art History with Asian Option and an MFA at California College of the Arts in 2009. She creates sculptures, installations, downloadable crafts, and participatory artist-­‐led projects. Recent projects include a 2012 commission from the San Jose Museum of Art and a year-­‐long parasitic contemporary art space called SpaceBi that takes place in the Asian Art Museum. She has exhibited locally at the 01 Biennial, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Meridian Gallery, Kearny Street Workshop, San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, 18 Reasons, Pro Arts Gallery, Mission Cultural Center, and Southern Exposure and has received awards and fellowships from the San Francisco Arts Commission, Barclay Simpson Award, Murphy and Cadogan Fellowship.  She has completed residencies at Blue Mountain Center in New York, Mission Grafica in San Francisco, and Montalvo Art Center in Saratoga, CA.

Top Solar Power US States (Per Capita)

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Of course lists, top-tens and the like are a very particular way of seeing the world, but this analysis, published on the blog CleanTechnica, of the USA by State and population is very interesting.  It shows how much solar PV is installed per capita (i.e. per head of population).  They have also published stats for wind power.

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It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
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