Yearly Archives: 2013

Bedlam Theatre Wins Venue Sustainability Prize

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

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Bedlam Theatre has taken the :entertaining sustainability Award for Venue Sustainability at the inaugural Technical Theatre Awards, presented at a ceremony held in October at the annual PLASA London live entertainment technology show at the ExCeL.

Charlotte Hodge, Bedlam’s Theatre Manager, collecting the Award on behalf of the student-led venue in Edinburgh, said, “Receiving this award is a huge honour for Bedlam. We feel that sustainability is so important to the future of theatre as a whole. We have many ideas on how to improve but as a student-run theatre company we don’t necessarily have the professional experience or the funds to know where to make a start on them. That is why this award is so important to us: it rewards our enthusiasm and our drive to make changes with the resources we have. This award will help us in our mission to make Bedlam Theatre a more sustainable venue for future members.”

Hodge continued, “Thanks must go to Edinburgh University and the Edinburgh University Students’ Association for their support; to Creative Carbon Scotland and Harry Giles of Festivals Edinburgh for their advice; and to the many Bedlam members who have got us to this point, in particular Luciana Miu, Adam Alton, Bryn Jones and Ruth Luckins.” Tim Atkinson, Technical Director of :entertaining sustainability, the award sponsor, said, “Bedlam Theatre’s team demonstrates once again that it is perfectly feasible to present uncompromising and exciting live entertainment whilst continually innovating and experimenting to reduce the residual impact of its operations”.

Atkinson went on, “By experimenting with initiatives such as electronic programmes, and collaborating with organisations such as Creative Carbon Scotland, Bedlam repeatedly pushes the envelope of what is achievable within their parameters. Most importantly, the team communicates their work with their audience – a crucial engagement – and with so many patrons at each performance, their message spreads quickly beyond the walls. Huge congratulations to them all.”

The Technical Theatre Awards has been established to recognise the achievements of backstage staff in production, and was given considerable industry support, not only by its host, Tony and Olivier Award-winning lighting designer and former chairman of the Association of Lighting Designers, Rick Fisher, but by the industry sponsors who supported each award.

The full list of winners is: Paul Arditti, dBS Award for Outstanding Achivement in Sound; Tim Routledge, Philips Entertainment Award for Outstanding Achievement in Lighting; Ben Philips, AVW Award for Outstanding Achievement in Automation; Jonathan Hall, StageBitz Award for Outstanding Achievement in Prop Making; Chris Layton, PRG Award for Outstanding Achievement in Education; Megan Cassidy, IOGIG Ltd Award for Outstanding Achievement in Wardrobe; Adam Searle, Load Cell Rental Award for Outstanding Achievement in Flys and Rigging; Stefan Musch, The Theatres Trust Award for Outstanding Achievement in Wigs and Makeup; Sadler’s Wells, Spotlight Accounting Award for Receiving Venue of the Year; Autograph Sound, AdVision Hire Company of the Year Award; Janet Williamson, Triple E Award for Outstanding Achievement in Building and Set Construction; Richard Bullimore, Lighting and Sound International Award for Outstanding Achievement in Production Management; Bedlam Theatre, :entertaining sustainability Award for Venue Sustainability.

For more information visit www.entertainingsustainability.com

Image: Charlotte Hodge, 2013-2014 Theatre Manager of Bedlam Theatre, collected the award hosted by Tim Atkinson and Rick Fisher

The post Bedlam Theatre Wins Venue Sustainability Prize appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Tiny Geographies by Chris Dooks

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Artist Chris Dooks has worked in 4 key locations, producing 4 short films of each area for Atomic Doric http://www.woodendbarn.com/atomic-doric/. He has interviewed different people who connect with the places – young nature groups, walkers, rangers etc – recording sounds, photographing and filming with them.

Tiny Geographies has created several hours of material including interviews and photographs, field recordings and more. Watch the trailer here:

The film premieres Friday 29 November 2013, 7:30pm at Woodend Barn with support from Edinburgh’s Drew Wright aka Wounded Knee.

Morag McFarclane (69) author of idiosyncratic text ‘The Aberdeenshire Field Book of The Exhausted Artist’ [Wodebooks 1971] writes in the written programme which accompanies this film:

This short trailer previews artist Chris Dooks’ [near feature-length] Year of Natural Scotland commission “Tiny Geographies” – a project managed by Woodend Barn in Banchory, Aberdeenshire as part of the ‘Atomic Doric’ season of commissioned works by artists and musicians.

The experimental ethos of the film was to ascertain to what degree could diverse audiovisual footage be gathered from several accessible environments just a few square metres in size. These ‘tiny’ geographies were made to see if there was any advantage to being unable to scale a ‘Munro’ or even a small hill – and try and make the best of out limited energy.

Using DSLR-sourced montages alongside the latest fangled GoPro camcorder [shooting at high speed], with microphones and hydrophones, Dooks employs the technology as friend of the ‘exhausted practitioner’ to spy, scope-out and mine the environment without touching it – or as Chris says ‘the only thing I like to shoot a deer with, is a Nikon lens.’

Inspired by photographer David Liittschwager’s ‘One Cubic Foot’ nature project (see tinyurl.com/onecubic) – the project is about depth over breadth and results in neither a ‘disability’ project nor a film about the extremes of exploring the wilderness. It’s about everyday people and everyday landscapes, but once peered into, there’s nothing everyday about either.

Over two months, digital montages of the areas were shot to a soundtrack sourced from over forty interviews with the public across national parks, reserves and estates in Aberdeenshire. Questions were asked of willing interviewees to use their answers as musical and regional source material. This large degree of public engagement has resulted in a work resembling something between a kind of sensory documentary and a suite or ‘movements’ akin to seasonal changes in the environment or a kind of extended overture to a particular (even peculiar) slice of Scotland.

A thin sliver of Chris’s personal life also makes it into the final cut not just because of the ease of clearing images of people and woodland wanderers, but also because this is not a cold ethnographic study of accents and hills.

Five areas were chosen, each a few miles from each other (and one fifty miles further) where the different technologies are part of this beautifully strange world.

The film was shot primarily over Aberdeenshire; Glen Tanar Estate near Aboyne, The Linn of Quioch near Braemar, Tomnaverie Stone Circle near Tarland, Muir of Dinnet National Nature Reserve near Dinnet and St Cyrus National Nature Reserve near Montrose.

TINY GEOGRAPHIES WAS FUNDED BY:

Creative Scotland

Aberdeenshire Council: Be Part of the Picture

Visit Scotland

Project managed by Woodend Barn, Banchory

with support from Discover Royal Deeside and Cairngorms

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK AVAILABLE FROM

chrisdooks.bandcamp.com

from December 2013

woodendbarn.co.uk

dooks.org

idioholism.com

All material © Chris Dooks 2013

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.
It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

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Australian seminar: ‘Galleries, museums and climate change’

This post comes to you from Culture|Futures

Australian seminar: ‘Galleries, museums and climate change’

The title ‘Galleries, Museums & Climate Change’ pretty well indicates the agenda for what the participants of a one-day seminar held at the University of Queensland Art Museum in Australia discussed and shared knowledge about on 13 November 2013: a cocktail of energy efficiency, sustainability, climate change – and culture.

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“The seminar looks at new approaches to environmental collection management protocols, lighting and sustainability. It also looks at ways in which our sector can educate and engage our audiences in issues of environmental sustainability and energy efficiency,” explained Executive Director of Museum & Gallery Services Queensland, Rebekah Butler.

Museum & Gallery Services Queensland – the peak professional body for the public museum and gallery sector in the Australian state Queensland – has organised the seminar in partnership with the University of Queensland Art Museum and the UQ Museum Studies.

Judith Nesbitt from Tate in United Kingdom led the discussion, speaking on the innovative work of this international cultural institution to reduce its carbon emissions and embed environmental sustainability across all areas of the organisation’s policy and practice. This includes building and exhibition design, through to the Tate’s catering and retail outlets.

Environmental sustainability at Tate

Judith Nesbitt is Head of National and International Partnerships at Tate in United Kingdom, and she leads Tate’s Sustainability Task Force with the aim of reducing the organisation’s carbon emissions and embedding environmental sustainability in policy and practice.

At the seminar, Judith Nesbitt gave a keynote speech on Environmental Sustainability at the Tate, and in the publicity material for the seminar, she gave a description of Tate’s efforts to reduce its environmental impact. She writes:

“For over five years, Tate has made a concerted effort to reduce its environmental impact and worked with colleagues in the museum sector to address the challenges specific to the sector.”

“This initiative has brought changes to how it cares for, presents and transports its collection, the operations across its varied estate, the design and engineering of its new buildings. Some of these changes are incremental; other changes require a greater shift, whether in practice or attitude. Staff, audiences, and artists all have a part to play in how we develop imaginative solutions to the environmental challenges of the 21st century.

Like many galleries, Tate has achieved reductions in the energy demand of heating and cooling its buildings, and taken the opportunity presented by capital projects, such as expansion of Tate Modern, to achieve energy efficient design through passive measures, maximising natural lighting and developing the use of LEDs.

All aspects of gallery practice are systematically examined, from re-usable wall systems for exhibitions, waste to heat contracts, to sustainable catering and trading. Aiming to embed sustainable practices across the organisation, Tate’s environmental strategy is championed by Green Reps, overseen by the Sustainability Task Force, regularly assessed by Trustees and detailed in its annual report.

The effort is not just an organisational one, since many of the most far-reaching changes require sector-wide agreement between lending institutions. Many international colleagues have indicated their readiness to adopt a smarter approach to running galleries and museums in the long-term public interest. Sharing experience and data is the first step towards well-founded changes of practice, which is why this seminar is a welcome opportunity.”

Source: magsq.com.au

No international agreement on parameters

How to reduce energy consumption without compromising the preservation of collections is an important and unresolved question with no consensus among museums which aim to manage the environmental parameters in the face of climate change.

“Relaxed environmental conditions for museums to reduce energy consumption, whilst not compromising the preservation of collections, have been on the table for consideration by the conservation community for at least the last five years. It is acknowledged that existing parameters are based on a blanket approach, and are unnecessarily tight for all but the most vulnerable of artworks.

Major museums and galleries worldwide are recognising this and implementing relaxed parameters, such as the Tate, the Smithsonian and the V&A.

Two years ago it looked as though international agreement was close. However a significant proportion of the conservation profession are not convinced that the risks in relaxing these parameters can be safely managed. Accordingly consensus amongst conservators internationally is not going to be achieved and therefore there will be no new blanket environmental standards.”

Curating Cities

Public art and sustainability in urban environments
Dr Laura Fisher from the National Institute for Experimental Arts spoke on the Linkage project Curating Cities. Led by researchers at the National Institute for Experimental Arts (COFA) in partnership with the City of Sydney, Carbon Arts, Object, and the University of Cincinnati, Curating Cities examines how the arts can generate environmentally beneficial behavior change and influence the development of green infrastructure in urban environments.

Over the last year Laura Fisher has been involved in building the Curating Cities database of eco-sustainable public art, which is a resource for researchers, artists, commissioning agencies, government bodies and members of the public who are interested in how public art can generate beneficial social change with respect to environmental sustainability.

“Curating Cities rests on the conviction that public art can very effectively serve the sustainability agenda if it is integrated into the processes of reshaping urban infrastructure and managing the efficient use of resources in cities. This presentation will explain the aspirations that underpin Curating Cities, and discuss several exemplary public art projects that have been documented on the Curating Cities database of eco-sustainable art.

It will also discuss the database’s purpose as an informative and evaluative resource that documents the mix of aesthetic, civic and environmental concerns that each work seeks to address, and provides useful insights into the funding arrangements, multi-party negotiations and problem-solving processes that bring public art projects to fruition.”

curatingcities.org

Contemporary art meets the environment: Artists Janet Laurence and Caroline Rothwell discussed their work on display in the UQ Art Museum. The artists talked about how they make visible the interconnections between nature and culture, and elaborate the devastating impact of human action on the environment.

Emrah Baki Ulas, lighting designer, educator and researcher, Associate at Steensen-Varming and co-author of ‘The Technical Industry Report on Museum and Gallery Lighting and Air Conditioning’ spoke on future options for economically and environmentally sustainable methods of display environments, preservation and storage of art and cultural material.

Showcase: As an environmental sustainable showcase the seminar took the participants on a tour of University of Queensland’s Global Change Institute building.

» Media release about the seminar: MRGalleriesMuseums Climate.pdf

Our Carbon Footprint

In August 2011, M&GSQ held a state conference which had a plenary entitled ‘Our Carbon Footprint’.

Slideshows and videos of presentations from this plenary session, such as Guy Abrahams’ CLIMARTE presentation ‘Climate Change, Sustainability and the Arts’ (video | powerpoint-document) are available online.
» Learn more on magsq.com.au

Culture|Futures is an international collaboration of organizations and individuals who are concerned with shaping and delivering a proactive cultural agenda to support the necessary transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.

The Cultural sector that we refer to is an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral, inter-genre collaboration, which encompasses policy-making, intercultural dialogue/cultural relations, creative cities/cultural planning, creative industries and research and development. It is those decision-makers and practitioners who can reach people in a direct way, through diverse messages and mediums.

Affecting the thinking and behaviour of people and communities is about the dissemination of stories which will profoundly impact cultural values, beliefs and thereby actions. The stories can open people’s eyes to a way of thinking that has not been considered before, challenge a preconceived notion of the past, or a vision of the future that had not been envisioned as possible. As a sector which is viewed as imbued with creativity and cultural values, rather than purely financial motivations, the cultural sector’s stories maintain the trust of people and society.
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Tree Days for Fife Primary Schools with FCA&C

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

FCAC-Artists-Jonathan-Baxter-+-Sarah-Gittins

Fife Contemporary Art and Craft recently got in touch to tell us about the culmination of their art and sustainability exhibition ‘The Kingdom of If’ which has been travelling across Fife in MAC, the region’s mobile art coach for the past 18 months.

Red Devil or Bloody Ploughman anyone? These colourful names are in fact varieties of apple! They will be part of a selection of apple, pear and plum trees being distributed to 14 primary schools across Fife from 19-21 November as part of 3 Tree Days to celebrate Scottish orchards and mark the culmination of Fife Contemporary Art & Craft’s eighteen month long, art & sustainability exhibition, ‘The Kingdom of If’, on board MAC, Fife’s mobile arts coach.

Curator of the exhibition, artist Jonathan Baxter, and fellow Fife based artist Sarah Gittins are both involved with DUO, Dundee Urban Orchard, an art and horticultural project in Dundee. For ‘Kingdom of If’, they’ve again combined their horticultural and artistic knowledge with an interest in sustainable living. It therefore seemed appropriate to bring the project to a close by off-setting the carbon emissions (over 10 years) caused by MAC travelling around Fife during the exhibition’s 18 month duration by planting fruit trees.

As primary schools in Fife are one of the main target groups for MAC, fruit trees were offered to schools who could give them a good home. At all the participating schools the trees will be cared for by their eco-schools’ committee or gardening club, or a specific class has been tasked with the responsibility as part of a larger project. When Jonathan and Sarah visit each school in November to deliver the trees, they will also talk to the pupils about the environmental importance of planting trees, the biodiversity of orchards, and also how to care for their trees.

In the last decade or so, Fife has seen a welcome revival of interest in its orchard heritage. As a result of the Tree Days, overall 8 mini orchards in Fife primary schools will either be created from scratch or augmented which can surely be seen as a significant addition to this burgeoning orchard ‘scene’ in Fife. It is also hoped that while the exhibition will have come to an end, its legacy in the form of fruit trees will continue for much longer.

FCA&C gratefully acknowledges support for Tree Days from the Forth Environment Link and the Central Scotland Green Network Development Fund 2013, and Forestry Commission Scotland. ‘Kingdom of If’ is supported by Museums Galleries Scotland. (The Forth Valley Orchard Initiative is funded by the Central Scotland Green Network Development Fund. The Central Scotland Green Network Orchard Grant Scheme 2013/2014, which is part of the initiative, covers the whole of the CSGN area.)

The post Tree Days for Fife Primary Schools with FCA&C appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

 

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Water Water Everywhere / Nay Any Drop to Drink

This post comes from Chantal Bilodeau’s Artists and Climate Change Blog

Nora York at Joe's Pub

In Water Water Everywhere / Nay Any Drop To Drink Nora York frames Handel’s Water Music suites with her own original compositions to confront the topic of climate change as it affects water—the oceans, rivers, aquifers, lakes, streams, wells, and our bodies and minds. It is both a love letter and a wake-up call about what is at stake within our current climate chaos. The work asks the audience to consider the essential value of water.

In preparation for Water Water Everywhere / Nay Any Drop To Drink, York engaged in conversations with scientists and activists in the fields of climate change and water. By “distilling the facts” she  identified the dominant images, metaphors, and concepts for her songs. York is also curating visual images for projections during portions of the live performance to create a complimentary metaphoric visual landscape to accompany the music. The visual artists committed to contributing images are Kiki Smith, Kate TealeJudith Belzer, and Jerry Kearns.

Joining York will be an ensemble of both contemporary and classical musician. Her long time collaborator and co-composer Jamie Lawrence, piano; will be joined by luminaries from the classical and jazz world including Charles McCraken, bassoon; Diane Lesser, oboe; Robin Zeh, Violin: Dave Hofstra, bass; Steve Tarshis, guitar; Peter Grant, drums.

After the concert performance, the audience was encouraged to engage with each other and environmental scientists and activists in an informal conversation in the lobby at The Public Theater and The Library Café on the mezzanine level.

Nora York photo

Joe’s Pub is one of more than 30 institutions participating in Marfa Dialogues/NY. The two-month calendar of events features a mix of environmental panels, live theatre, major art exhibitions, installations, community forums, musical performances and more – all accessible to the public and available via broadcast and digital media.

ABOUT NORA YORK: Nora York has performed and written her own music for theater, film, television, concert and cabaret. She has four CDs in release, been awarded a Robert Rauschenberg Foundation grant, two New York State Council on the Arts composers commissions and her work has been commissioned by The Public Theater in New York and The Brooklyn Academy of Music. She has performed at concert venues, universities and festivals in the U.S., Mexico, Canada and Europe. (Ted, Newport Jazz Festival, Ottawa Jazz Festival, JVC Jazz festival, Lincoln Center, and Merkin Hall and Lincoln Center Out of Doors.) She has been teaching at New York University since 1997.

ABOUT MARFA DIALOGUE NY: Marfa Dialogues/NY is an examination of climate change science, environmental activism and artistic practice taking place this October and November 2013 in New York City. A collaboration between the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Ballroom Marfa and the Public Concern Foundation, Marfa Dialogues/NY will feature more than 20 Program Partners and a spectrum of exhibitions, performance, and interdisciplinary discussions at the intersection of the arts and climate change. Marfa Dialogues was co-founded in 2010 by Ballroom Marfa, a leading contemporary arts center in Far West Texas, and The Public Concern Foundation (PCF), a New York non-profit devoted to the advancement of public education around social and political topics. Marfa Dialogues was originally conceived as a symposium to broaden public exploration of the intersection of art, politics and culture.

Filed under: Music

Artists and Climate Change is a blog by playwright Chantal Bilodeau that tracks artistic responses from all disciplines to the problem of climate change. It is both a study about what is being done, and a resource for anyone interested in the subject. Art has the power to reframe the conversation about our environmental crisis so it is inclusive, constructive, and conducive to action. Art can, and should, shape our values and behavior so we are better equipped to face the formidable challenge in front of us.

Go to Chantal Bilodeau’s Artists and Climate Change Blog

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Press Release: Free Training to Help Arts Organisations Reduce CO2 Emissions

This post comes from Creative Carbon Scotland

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At our November 4th open meeting Imagine a Different Future: The Arts Shaping a Sustainable Scotland we announced a new training programme for arts organisations that want to measure, report and reduce their carbon emissions. Free workshops throughout Scotland from January to March will provide arts organisations with the tools and knowledge to measure and reduce carbon emissions from energy, water, waste and travel.

The project follows the arts funder Creative Scotland’s announcement that it will invite arts, screen and creative industries organisations to report their carbon emissions as part of its contribution to achieving Scotland’s climate change targets. As a Public Body, Creative Scotland is updating its own environmental sustainability policy. From 1 April 2014 it will measure its own carbon emissions and ask organisations and individuals that it funds to provide information about their own environmental impacts.

Creative Carbon Scotland’s Director Ben Twist said:

We support Creative Scotland’s decision to introduce carbon measurement and reporting as the evidence is clear that measuring is the essential first step to reducing carbon emissions. Recent reports show that climate change is affecting us all. Scotland has world leading targets to reduce its carbon emissions and we think the arts should be at the heart of this. We have therefore worked with Creative Scotland to make this reporting as easy as possible and useful to organisations in reducing their carbon emissions. We will provide free training to arts organisations beginning to improve their environmental sustainability so that the arts world is helping lead the drive towards a low carbon Scotland.

Creative Carbon Scotland already works with 70 arts organisations, from Edinburgh’s Festivals to theatres and galleries, to help reduce their carbon emissions and save energy and money. Its unique website, www.creativecarbonscotland.com, brings together news about projects and events joining the arts and environmental sustainability in Scotland. It also includes the Green Arts Portal, a specially designed site providing hundreds of tips on carbon reduction and useful resources to help take action and free access to the Julie’s Bicycle IG Tools – a cultural sector carbon calculator – and sMeasure, a building energy and water management system.

(ENDS)

NOTES TO EDITORS

Creative Carbon Scotland is a charity initiated by Edinburgh’s Festivals with key partners the Federation of Scottish Theatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network. It is supported by the National Lottery through Creative Scotland and the City of Edinburgh Council’s Culture and Sport division. For more information visit www.creativecarbonscotland.com or call Director Ben Twist on 0131 529 7909/07931 553872

Creative Scotland Director of Communications Kenneth Fowler outlined Creative Scotland’s revised environmental sustainability policy at the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation on 4 November. The policy states that from the financial year 2014/15 Creative Scotland will report its own carbon emissions and ask recipients of its funding to report their own emissions, in line with its responsibilities as a Public Body under the Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009.

Workshops CCS will run three phases of workshops in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Inverness, Aberdeen, Dundee, Dumfries and other locations depending on demand, as well as offering video-conference workshops for remotely located organisations. Workshop 1 introduces the project and provides the basics of measuring energy, water and waste; Workshop 2 focuses on measuring business travel; the 3rd phase is the first of regular Green Meets, providing informal knowledge sharing and advice between local Green Champions. All workshops will be free for arts organisations supported by Creative Scotland.

IG Tools CCS works in partnership with Julie’s Bicycle, the leading London-based agency working on carbon reduction in the arts, to provide a special Scottish version of the Industry Green tools, used widely throughout England, Wales and abroad.

sMeasure CCS licenses this powerful building energy and water management tool especially designed for small and medium sized businesses, provided by Pilio Ltd, for free use by Scottish arts organisations.

Image: Artist Nic Green speaking speaking at Image A Different Future

The post Press Release: Free Training to Help Arts Organisations Reduce CO2 Emissions appeared first on Creative Carbon Scotland.

Creative Carbon Scotland is a partnership of arts organisations working to put culture at the heart of a sustainable Scotland. We believe cultural and creative organisations have a significant influencing power to help shape a sustainable Scotland for the 21st century.

In 2011 we worked with partners Festivals Edinburgh, the Federation of Scottish Threatre and Scottish Contemporary Art Network to support over thirty arts organisations to operate more sustainably.

We are now building on these achievements and working with over 70 cultural organisations across Scotland in various key areas including carbon management, behavioural change and advocacy for sustainable practice in the arts.

Our work with cultural organisations is the first step towards a wider change. Cultural organisations can influence public behaviour and attitudes about climate change through:

Changing their own behaviour;
Communicating with their audiences;
Engaging the public’s emotions, values and ideas.

Go to Creative Carbon Scotland

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Call for papers, Seismopolite Journal of Art and Politics, issue 6: The future of the biennial: experimental places to reinvent political space?

seismopolite logo
Call for papers, Seismopolite Journal of Art and Politics, issue 6: The future of the biennial: experimental places to reinvent political space?

The upcoming issue of Seismopolite Journal of Art and Politics will discuss the political future of the contemporary art biennial. How can biennials become experimental «sites» to rethink the relationship between art and politics, without lending themselves too easily to the confines of the contemporary art market and neoliberal political geography? While biennials have been criticized for subjecting themselves to urban/ regional marketing strategies, they have also been defended as valuable places for the formation of new alliances among art scenes of the ‘periphery’, that are today steadily changing the global art map.

Does this development indicate a future potential of biennials to rewrite the history, political geography and epistemology of places and regions, and to do so from standpoints that resist annexation by historical master narratives, neoliberal political geography as well as the demands and languages of the global contemporary art market? Or do we need to look entirely outside the biennial system for such standpoints to be realized in a consequential way?

For our next issue we welcome reviews of biennials worldwide as well as essays and interviews that address these questions through a high variety of possible angles.

We accept submissions continuously, but to make sure you are considered for the upcoming issue, please send your proposal, CV and samples of earlier work to submissions@seismopolite.com within November 21, 2013.

Many thanks!