Yearly Archives: 2012

Island at the National Theatre

This post comes to you from Ashden Directory

Abandoned whaling settlement at Pauline Cove, Herschel Island

Kellie Gutman reports:

A new play for children ages 8 and up runs at the Cottesloe Theatre 15-25 February.  Island, by award-winning author Nicky Singer (Feather Boy), has been commissioned by the National Theatre’s Learning programme.  The play is set on the remote Arctic island of Herschel.

[It] raises questions about the effects of climate change on the island.  the play centres on a London schoolboy, Cameron, forced to spend his school holiday without computer, phone or Facebook with his scientist mother on the remote Herschel Island, where he encounters an indigenous girl whose stories open up this different world.

Along with the performances and workshops for family audiences at the Cottesloe Theatre, Island will tour to primary schools in London throughout the spring term.

“ashdenizen blog and twitter are consistently among the best sources for information and reflection on developments in the field of arts and climate change in the UK” (2020 Network)

ashdenizen is edited by Robert Butler, and is the blog associated with the Ashden Directory, a website focusing on environment and performance.
The Ashden Directory is edited by Robert Butler and Wallace Heim, with associate editor Kellie Gutman. The Directory includes features, interviews, news, a timeline and a database of ecologically – themed productions since 1893 in the United Kingdom. Our own projects include ‘New Metaphors for Sustainability’, ‘Flowers Onstage’ and ‘Six ways to look at climate change and theatre’.

The Directory has been live since 2000.

Go to The Ashden Directory

State of the Arts gets the environment

This post comes to you from Ashden Directory

Wallace Heim writes: 

At the most recent State of the Arts (SOTA) conference hosted by Arts Council England in Salford had, for the first time, two sessions on ‘Artists and our future environment’, with speakers James Marriott from PLATFORM; the writer Jay GriffithsMojisola Adebayo, writer, performer, director; and Andy Field, co-director of Forest Fringe.

All of SOTA’s sessions – on the creative economy, changing society, imagination, fundraising – touch on environmental themes. But these two drew out specific questions of the relations between artists and environments, of the material effects of artistic practices on the Earth, and of the importance of artistic expression of environmental themes.

This interest by SOTA in the environment comes about, in part, from talks between ACE London and arts organisations with an environmental focus in the London region – organisations who had lost their Regularly Funded Organisation status, and questioned ACE’s policies on the environment and climate.

James Marriott’s session, transcribed on the PLATFORM blog, sets out how this collaboration between disparate organisations has worked, and how substantial shifts in ACE’s environmental directions are taking shape.

“ashdenizen blog and twitter are consistently among the best sources for information and reflection on developments in the field of arts and climate change in the UK” (2020 Network)

ashdenizen is edited by Robert Butler, and is the blog associated with the Ashden Directory, a website focusing on environment and performance.
The Ashden Directory is edited by Robert Butler and Wallace Heim, with associate editor Kellie Gutman. The Directory includes features, interviews, news, a timeline and a database of ecologically – themed productions since 1893 in the United Kingdom. Our own projects include ‘New Metaphors for Sustainability’, ‘Flowers Onstage’ and ‘Six ways to look at climate change and theatre’.

The Directory has been live since 2000.

Go to The Ashden Directory

Caroline Dear’s SUAINTE at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Skye

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Detail from Caroline Dear’s 100 Ropes

Tha Sabhal Mòr Ostaig a’ toirt fiathachadh dhuibh a thighinn gu an taisbeanadh

SUAINTE

le Caroline Dear

Taisbeanadh 11 An Gearran – 16 An Giblean 2012

Taisbeanadh a’ nochdadh obair leis an neach-ealain Caroline Dear a tha a’ fuireach san Eilean Sgitheanach. Tha ròpannan, ceud dhiubh, a chaidh fhighe a h-uile latha, cha mhòr, thairis air sia mìosan à cuiseagan is lusan is feur, nam meadhan air an dàimh a tha eadar sinn agus an àrainneachd bheò a chur an cèill.

==

An exhibition by Skye-based artist Caroline Dear that shows our subtle relationship with the living landscape through 100 individual ropes made nearly every day over a 6 month period, from different plant materials.

Sabhal Mòr Ostaig invites you to the exhibition

SUAINTE

by Caroline Dear

Exhibition 11 February – 16 April 2012

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

Tim Flannery speaks in Edinburgh

This post comes to you from EcoArtScotland

Scott Donaldson at Creative Scotland wanted ecoartscotland to highlight this opportunity to hear Tim Flannery (mammalogist, palaeontologist, environmentalist and global warming activist) speak:

6pm Wednesday 4th April, Royal Society of Edinburgh.

Tim Flannery is one of Australia’s leading thinkers and writers. As a scientist, explorer and conservationist his achievements are many. Amongst them are the discovery of over thirty new species of mammal, being honoured Australian of the Year in 2007, co-founding and chairing the Copenhagen Climate Council, and selling over a million copies of his book The Weather Makers, one of the most influential texts in our understanding of global warming.

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear Tim speak about his extensive work.

The event is jointly presented by the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Royal Commonwealth Society’s Oxygen Programme and Creative Scotland’s Creative Futures programme.

ecoartscotland is a resource focused on art and ecology for artists, curators, critics, commissioners as well as scientists and policy makers. It includes ecoartscotland papers, a mix of discussions of works by artists and critical theoretical texts, and serves as a curatorial platform.

It has been established by Chris Fremantle, producer and research associate with On The Edge ResearchGray’s School of Art, The Robert Gordon University. Fremantle is a member of a number of international networks of artists, curators and others focused on art and ecology.
Go to EcoArtScotland

THE FUTURE IS NOT WHAT IT USED TO BE

The Future Is Not What It Used to Be, curated by Amanda Roscoe Mayo, will be on display in the Michael and Noémi Neidorff Art Gallery at Trinity University from March 1- April 7, 2012. There will be an opening reception on March 1st from 5-7pm.  A gallery talk with the curator and artists will begin at 6pm.

The Future is Not What it Used To Be features works by thirteen artists exploring human incursion on the landscape. Through a variety of media, these artists offer contrasting views of the landscape as touched by human hand through both destruction and conservation.  The exhibition asks, when did nature turn from sustained into sustainable?

The exhibition features artists Ansel Adams; Jeana Baumgardner and Sandy Carson from Austin; Erik Grow and Scot Polach from San Francisco; Caleb Jagger and Todd Jagger from Fort Davis, Texas; Adam Katseff from Stanford, California; Leigh Anne Lester from San Antonio; Allie Mount from Portland, Oregon; Kristin Musgnug from Fayetteville, Arkansas; Adam Waldron-Blain from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; and Liz Ward from Castroville, Texas.

Curator Amanda Roscoe Mayo is a graduate of Trinity University where she majored in studio art.  She is now the Co-Director of PLAySPACE Gallery at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco, California, where she is a candidate for a Masters in Curatorial Practice. She also co-founded R&R, a curatorial collective based in San Francisco.

Michael and Noémi Neidorff Art Gallery

Dicke Art Building, Department of Art and Art History

Trinity University, One Trinity Place, San Antonio, TX, 78212

Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 1-5pm