Yearly Archives: 2010

Transformer Framework Panel #13 – BUILT TO LAST? truths & myths of sustainable cultural production on Vimeo

Transformer Framework Panel #13 – BUILT TO LAST? truths & myths of sustainable cultural production from Transformer on Vimeo.

June 3, 2010, 6:30 – 8pm at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

**Please note: the duration of this panel was 2 hours, but video cuts out at 1 hour and 45 minutes. Apologies!**

Presented in tandem with Sustainability Lab & Cornfield, this panel will look back and look ahead at the ever-evolving Do-It-Yourself ethic and inherent aesthetics as it relates to cultural production. Timed with the 30th anniversary of Washington DC’s Dischord Records – an internationally recognized independent record label supporting punk rock music that has been artist run since its inception – this panel will examine the DIY organizing model that grew out of punk rock subculture and is tied to punk ideology and anti-consumerism. How is DIY being redefined as aspects of that culture shift from being an underground mantra to a cable TV station slogan and Urban Outfitters commodity? What can cultural producers learn from sustainable food producers? How can a volunteer-run operation be sustainable?

Panelists: Nancy Bannon, artist, DC & NYC; Bryce Dwyer, InCUBATE, Chicago; Ian MacKaye, co-founder of Dischord Records, DC; Eve Mosher, Seeding the City, NYC; Abigail Satinsky, InCUBATE, Chicago

Moderator: Jeff Hnilicka, cultural worker, Member of Hit Factorie and organizer of FEAST, Brooklyn

via Transformer Framework Panel #13 – BUILT TO LAST? truths & myths of sustainable cultural production on Vimeo.

Free Convergence Session TOMORROW Sunday 9/5/10 at the Hyatt at Fisherman’s Wharf

This year, we’re taking the convergence to the road.  We’ll be converging in two cities, and in between, on an all-inclusive weekend getaway!  Exploring human impact on the Earth, and Art’s impact on human impact, we’ll discuss environmental justice, urban nature, and what it means to be an artist who brings environmental issues to the public.

MISS THE REGISTRATION DEADLINE?

Join us for our Sunday afternoon session in San Francisco, featuring Amy Balkin, Patricia Watts, Laura Parker, and Nik Bertulis.  Curated by Moe Beitiks.  You can also check out our “a la carte” events.  Book your own ticket and meet us there!

Held at the Hyatt at Fisherman’s Wharf:

555 North Point Street

San Francisco, California 94133

Sunday, September 5th.  1pm-5pm.

Seating is limited.  Reserve your space at

http://cspaconvergence.eventbrite.com/

AGENDA

Saturday, September 4 LOS ANGELES  TO SAN FRANCISCO

  • 10am Depart Los Angeles.  Carpool/Caravan will feature the Invisible 5 Audio Tour and select stops.
  • 5pm Arrive San Francisco
  • 6pm Dinner Break
  • 7pm Shotgun Players: Solar Powered Theater Discussion
  • 8pm Performance: Living Together at Shotgun Players

Sunday September 5 SAN FRANCISCO

  • 8am Nature Tour
  • 12pm Lunch Break
  • 1pm Afternoon Sessions featuring Patricia Watts/EcoArtSpace, Amy Balkin, Laura Parker, and Nik Bertulis.  Curated by Moe Beitiks
  • 6pm Art Walk & Dinner

Monday, September 6 SAN FRANCISCO TO LOS ANGELES

  • 8am Depart for guided highway tour down the 101.  We’ll be following the Urban Ranger’s Field Guide to the American Road Trip.
  • 6pm Arrive Los Angeles

Sustainability | eyebeam.org

The Eyebeam Sustainability Research Group is comprised of past and present residents, fellows, and staff. Our goals are to improve the internal practices, physical infrastructure and materials used at Eyebeam to create a lab for workable sustainable solutions, to educate ourselves and the public through programs and exhibitions, and to facilitate the creation of sustainability-related projects at and beyond Eyebeam. The main areas of focus for the group have been energy, materials and making, urban sustainability issues, especially transportation and pollution, and green spaces and agriculture.

Check it out:  Sustainability | eyebeam.org.

7 BILLIONTH PERSON PROJECT

We have roughly 1,000 days before the seventh billion human being joins the rest of us on Planet Earth. We do not know what country she will be born in, or who her family will be, or if she will be a she or a he.  But we do know this being will join the rest of us as a citizen of this world.  Working on a welcome message to our seventh billion fellow human being provides us with a rare but overdue opportunity for introspection as well as a frank accounting of the implicit responsibilities we have toward other human beings and future generations.  What would you like to tell her about this world, about life, about your story?  What would you like to show her about the world? The 7 Billionth Person Project aims to collect creative expressions from citizens from around the world.  Visual submissions are highly encouraged.  All media accepted.

Partners for the exhibition include The Arts Council of New Haven, Proof: Media for Social Justice, the Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health, and the Yale World Fellows Program.   Website: http://www.collectiveanswers.org.

Questions? Email Valerie Belanger at info@collectiveanswers.org

via WOOLOO.ORG – 7 BILLIONTH PERSON PROJECT.

Art, Environment, and Place

Many innovative approaches to form and content are evolving in contemporary arts practice that transcend traditional boundaries of art making. Many artists are integrating various field and research strategies borrowed from the natural sciences, geography, and other disciplines to create rich interdisciplinary works of art that are often collaborative and experimental in nature. The interdisciplinary nature of these art works encourages a diverse and varied audience.

This honors seminar course (HONORS 413 Section 02) scheduled for Fall 2010 at San Diego State University will be centered around focused readings, discussions, presentations, screenings, and field trips. Students will conceive and execute a final project proposal that may take the form of a hybrid documentary, temporary site-specific artwork or installation, digital multimedia feature, performance, text, or other work that addresses social, cultural, environmental, geographical, and/or political issues of a local or regional ecology, site, or subject. Special emphasis will be placed on projects that are collaborative, incorporate sustainable design strategies, promote environmental awareness through education, and/or directly encourage audience participation. Projects, possibly collaborative in nature, will be distilled, executed, and documented at the conclusion of the course. A background in art is not required to take this course. Students from all academic and disciplinary areas are encouraged to apply.

The course will culminate in an immersive three-day weekend field study workshop at the Salton Sea scheduled for the weekend of November 19 – 21, 2010. During this workshop students will be able to directly experience and respond to place over an embedded field research period.  Visiting artist/architect,Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, will join us for this weekend field experience. Students will be prepared before embarking on the field trip through readings and presentations on diverse topics related to the site including but not limited to regional water politics, agricultural/real estate economies, local ecologies, military presence, tourism, outsider art, fringe subcultures among others. A culminating art exhibit and publication will be organized to document student interdisciplinary projects resulting from this course and workshop.

This course will meet Wednesdays from 4 to 6:40 pm in PSFA-113 during fall semester 2010..

via Art, Environment, and Place.

John Kay – A good economist knows the true value of the arts

Activities that are good in themselves are good for the economy, and activities that are bad in themselves are bad for the economy. The only intelligible meaning of “benefit to the economy” is the contribution – direct or indirect – the activity makes to the welfare of ordinary citizens.

Many people underestimate the contribution disease makes to the economy. In Britain, more than a million people are employed to diagnose and treat disease and care for the ill. Thousands of people build hospitals and surgeries, and many small and medium-size enterprises manufacture hospital supplies. Illness contributes about 10 per cent of the UK’s economy: the government does not do enough to promote disease.

Such reasoning is identical to that of studies sitting on my desk that purport to measure the economic contribution of sport, tourism and the arts. These studies point to the number of jobs created, and the ancillary activities needed to make the activities possible. They add up the incomes that result. Reporting the total with pride, the sponsors hope to persuade us not just that sport, tourism and the arts make life better, but that they contribute to something called “the economy”.

READ ON //>  John Kay – A good economist knows the true value of the arts.

Remediate/Re-vision exhibition at Wave Hill

I recently attended the opening for Remediate/Re-vision: Public Artists Engaging the Environmentat Wave Hill in the Bronx. The exhibition showcases artists’ projects that raise awareness about issues concerning watershed fragility, industrial and natural history, personal responsibility, and ecological balance. Artists in the exhibition include Lillian Ball, Jackie Brookner, Mags Harries and Lajos Heder, Natalie Jeremijenko, Patricia Johanson, Lorna Jordan, Matthew Mazzotta, Eve Mosher, Buster Simpson, Susan Leibovitz Steinman, Suzanne Lacy, and Yutaka Kobayashi, George Trakas and Mierle Laderman Ukeles.

The exhibition design provides each artist or artist team with a large wall presentation including text, photographic images, documentation and in some cases videos. It’s graphically crisp and clear to look at if somewhat bookish. Curator Jennifer McGregor explained to me that the entire exhibition will be very easy to travel as everything is designed on computer files that can be sent without shipping anything. Nice to see a “green” show with a green concept for travel! This exhibition focuses on current or recently completed projects with a few exceptions.

ecoartspace provided two video interviews for this exhibition. Patricia Johanson was interviewed by Amy Lipton and Jackie Brookner was interviewed by Patricia Watts. For viewing the interviews please go to the ecoartspace youtube page HERE.

Several of the artists were there for the opening and gave brief talks about their work. First to speak was Lillian Ball about her completed project WaterWash which is made of recycled glass, permeable pavement and vegetation to replace asphalt to act as storm water mitigation in Southhold Long Island, NY. She also presented an architectural model as a proposal for a new version of WaterWash for the Bronx River.

Buster Simpson then spoke about his work titled The Monolith in Redding, CA. This work was commissioned by Turtle Bay Exploration Park and created from the ruins of a former gravel plant and the building of the Shasta Dam. Simpson has proposed a water recirculation system and large solar panel for the rooftop of the structure.

George Trakas spoke about his Newton Creek Nature Walk in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. He created public access to a long-inaccessible shoreline surrounding the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. Trakas’ Nature Walk provides an interpretive frame on its surroundings. From staged granite steps to the water’s edge, visitors can sit on a series of getdowns perforating the bulkhead along the Whale Creek tributary.

Mags Harries and Lajos Héder, presented Terra Fugit. This project provided an opportunity for the artists to fully design a section of a new regional park in a fast growing, completely new community in Miramar, South Florida. The design explores the nature of the land, time, and human occupation and development on a 200-acre site located near the Everglades. This area was still open wetlands in the late 90’s and the waterway, excavated to obtain fill material for raising the grade of the surrounding site, has become the central focus of the park.

Lorna Jordan, spoke about her project Terraced Cascade in Scottsdale, Arizona. The work consists of a series of stepped, rib-like terraces and vertebrae-like cascades. Water flows down the cascade in a metaphorical gesture that suggests water rolling down a human spine—a miniature watershed allows storm water to supplement the irrigation system. Planted terraces provide a demonstration of desert-conscious landscaping and the sculptural garden is an abstraction of the human body in the desert landscape. The artwork’s objective of creatively using storm water is sensitive to the need for harvesting, using and reusing water in an otherwise dry region.

Jackie Brookner presented her recent project, Veden Taika, The Magic of Water. The work consists of three floating islands in the Halikonlahti Bird Pools in Salo, Finland. The largest island provides nesting sites for birds and the two smaller islands contain plants for phytoremediation, These islands are vegetated with plants specially chosen to remove pollutants from the water and sediments. During the warm months a cloud of mist, powered by wind, will rise up over the islands several times a day. Wind powered aerators beneath the islands oxygenate the water and stimulate microbial processes on the plant roots.

Eve Mosher, then spoke about her current project, Seeding the City, in NYC which utilizes social networking to site urban interventions in the form of green roof modules. It capitalizes on community building to introduce urban environmental issues and remediation tools. The modules and their accompanying flags and street level signage will track the growth of the network throughout the neighborhood. Online resources will include mapping of the project, tools for tracking local urban heat island effect and resources to recreate the project worldwide. ecoartspace participated in Seeding the City last fall as part of the exhibition Down to Earth at 53 Mercer St, NYC, we had four of the original planted roof modules on view.

Last, but far from least, Mierle Laderman Ukeles spoke eloquently about her ongoing decades of work with the Fresh Kills Landfill in Staten Island, NY. As the official artist in residence of the NYC Dept. of Sanitation, Mierle has been involved from the beginning in the plan to transform Fresh Kills Landfill into a public park. The park will eventually have four sections, and will be twice the size of Central Park. Mierle suggested that it might take another 20 – 30 years before the park is completed. (In the same breath she mentioned that she is now 70 yrs old). The average time period for all of the works represented in Remediate/Revision from inception to completion was 10 years. Mierle is an inspiration in her dedication and perseverance as are all of the artists in this exhibition that take on large-scale public remediation projects as art.

Meanwhile, Mierle has a proposal soon to be implemented for one million people to participate in an artwork for Fresh Kills Park titled PUBLIC OFFERINGS MADE BY ALL REDEEMED BY ALL, where “Donor Citizens” will release material offerings via cultural transfer stations. Stay tuned for more information on that as well as on upcoming events at Wave Hill associated with this exhibition.

Artists Talks will take place on Saturday October 9th with Natalie Jeremijenko and Patricia Johanson and on Sunday October 10th with Jackie Brookner, Eve Mosher and Susan Leibovitz Steinman at Wave Hill.

Remediate/Re-Vision is up at Wave Hill through November 28, 2010.

Images top to bottom: Veden Taika, The Magic of Water by Jackie Brookner; Mags Harries and Lajos Heder speaking about Terra Fugit; Waterwash by Lillian Ball; Terraced Cascade by Lorna Jordan, Mist rising over Veden Taika, The Magic of Water by Jackie Brookner, Seeding the City by Eve Mosher, Aerial view of 2200 acre boundary of Fresh Kills Landfill

Go to EcoArtSpace