Yearly Archives: 2010

APInews: E.U. Ministers Call for Culture in Economic Plan

European Union ministers have called for culture to be put at the “heart” of the blocs new economic plan, the Europe 2020 strategy according to Helen Spongenberg on euobserver.com 4/6/10. It could mean that Europe will invest more in its creative industries as a source of future growth. In late April, the E.U. executive is set to adopt its “Green Paper on Cultural and Creative Industries,” aimed at unlocking the economic potential of cultural and creative industries in Europe, a sector that generates five million jobs and represents 2.6 percent of GDP in the 27-nation bloc. The sector includes areas as diverse as cinema, music, publishing, the media, fashion, interior and product design, cultural tourism, performing arts and heritage. Critics warn that Europe should not neglect cultural diversity and caution against homogenizing European culture.

APInews: E.U. Ministers Call for Culture in Economic Plan.

More info on The Green Theatre Project at Arcola

We’ve had a great response from many talented people. More than we expected actually and it has become necessary to go through a short selection process (see message below). The project commences Saturday, April 17 at 2pm at Arcola Theatre. It is for performers, writers, theatre practitioners and generally interested people over 18. The aim is to use theatre to explore a variety of sustainability themes and create a high-quality short performance piece. If you are still interested in being involved here is some more information.

The group will meet over seven weeks, exploring sustainability issues through a variety of theatrical workshops, with the intention of devising a short performance piece. The location and dates of the performances are still to be confirmed. It will mostly likely be an outdoor or site specific performance. It is going to be very much a collaborative process and we welcome input from as many view points as possible. This is the first outing of The Green Theatre Project so there will be a lot of room to play.

Here is an outline of the sessions:

Session 1 – April 17, Arcola (2 -4pm)

  • Intros
  • Idea sharing
  • Short devising session around a theme

Session 2 – April 24, Spitalfields City Farm (2 -4pm)

  • Physical theatre workshop led by Irene Athanassiou
  • Devise short movement sequence
  • Decide on theme of final performance

Session 3 – May 1, Arcola (2 -4pm)

  • Forum theatre workshop led by Rosie Leach
  • Structure and form of final performance decided

Session 4 – May 8, Arcola (2 -4pm)

  • LeCoq workshop led by Skip Theatre (tbc)
  • Workshop potential material for final performance

Session 5 – May 15, Arcola (2 -4pm)

  • Interpreting text workshop (based on an Irish play) led by Cathal Clearly
  • Workshop and rehearse writer’s material for final performance piece

Session 6 – May 22, Arcola (2 -4pm)

  • Workshop and rehearse performance piece

Session 7 – May 29, location to be announced (2 -4pm)

  • Dress rehearsal/possible preview performance

Potential themes: energy usage, resource consumption and distribution, human/nature relationship, interconnectedness, the individual’s behaviour, fair trade, conservation, sustainable agriculture, social sustainability, etc. (These are just possibilities, the group will decide together on what issues they want to explore)

IMPORTANT: If you are interested in being involved, please send us a short paragraph describing what you hope to get out of the project and what you could bring to it. As well as what role(s) you would be interested in for the performance piece (i.e. writer, performer, stage manager, producer, etc) and a contact phone number. In order to be considered for the project we need to receive your email by the end of Tuesday, April 13. We will then let you know who has a place in the group. Please also let us know if you can not make any of the dates. We will be giving priority to people who can make six or more of the seven sessions.

Please note: That although the group is suitable for non-performers, the workshops will require some performance elements within the group.

Thank you for your interest and we look forward to hearing from you!

-Lisa and Rosie

The Green Theatre Project Arcola – greentheatreproject@googlemail.com

What Matters Most? ecoartspace benefit art exhibition

ecoartspace invites you to our first New York City benefit exhibition titled What Matters Most? hosted by Exit Art from April 15 – 28th, 2010.

Over 225 participating artists have created an original 8 x 10″ artwork related to the NY Times Dot Earth blog question of What Matters Most? or they have donated an existing work. For more information and a complete list of artists please read our blog:

http://ecoartspacewhatmattersmost2010.blogspot.com/

What Matters Most? began with responses to this question posted Monday, February 15th on Andrew Revkin’s NY Times Dot Earth blog by leading environmental experts, writers and readers – and is still active on the archive:

http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/15/what-matters-most/

Artworks will go on sale (first come first serve) beginning on noon at April 15th and ending on April 28th at 9pm at Exit Art Underground Space, 475 10th Ave at 36th St, NYC.

Music performances of Whale Music by David RothenbergNight Science by Ben Neill

Tickets are $135 in advance, $150 at the door for admission and includes a work of art. Admission Only tickets are $35 each.

If you can not attend but would like to support ecoartspace with a donation please go to this link for SEE, our fiscal sponsor:

https://p7.secure.hostingprod.com/@www.saveourplanet.org/ssl/Donate.html

Aesthetics, Art, and Politics at University of Helsinki

Finnish Society for Aesthetics
PO Box 4, FIN-0 0 0 1 4 UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI
www.estetiikka.fi

“Aesthetics, Art, and Politics,” 6.5.-7.5.2010, University of Helsinki

The Finnish Society for Aesthetics together with the research project Artification and its Impact on Art (http://www.artification.fi/) will arrange a two-day seminar on the theme “Aesthetics, Art, and Politics” from the 6th of May to the 7th of May 2010 at the University of Helsinki. The keynote speaker of the seminar is Professor Aleš Erjavec (Slovenia).

Significant connections between aesthetics, art, and politics continue to exist in the new millennium. However, alongside traditional questions about art’s relationship to politics and the political aspects of aesthetic phenomena, a new set of issues has gradually arisen which are as much a
result of changes occurring in aesthetics and art as they are a result of changes that have recently shaped politics. The criticism that different traditions of contemporary aesthetics have aimed against the idea of “pure aesthetics,” i.e., an aesthetics severed from political considerations, has been widely accepted. But what is the position of aesthetic theories which emphasize the social function of art and aesthetics today? Do the main traditions of contemporary aesthetics any longer manage to account for the current forms that the relationship between aesthetics, art, and politics takes or are novel approaches required for analyzing those connections?

Many other social practices besides art are to a growing extent characterized by features which have traditionally been associated primarily with art. What sorts of aesthetic and political consequences could this process known as “artification” involve? What are the effects of this development, for
example, to the alleged autonomous nature of art or is this supposition a mere fallacy anyway? Different artistic traditions and movements embody different kinds of ideologies. How should one understand the relationship between art and politics in a world where faith in the impact of politics is
increasingly diminishing? Changes of approach in recent art research also provide a new outlook on the theme of the seminar. Do the different research approaches articulate specific views of the connection between aesthetics and politics and what sorts of political underpinnings, if any, could these approaches themselves involve?

Art, Ecology and Citizen Power

Tomorrow, the Dutch artist Marjolijn Dijkman arrives in the UK to begin her residency atClare Cottage in Helpston, near Peterborough. Her stay marks a shift in focus for Arts & Ecology, towards exploring how the arts may engage people locally with environmental change and sustainability. As part of this, Marjolijn has been invited to stay at the home of the local romantic poet John Clare who died in 1864, so is no longer living there. The cottage was refurbished last year and Marjolijn intends to explore contemporary ideas about ‘place’ with people in the surrounding villages and the city of Peterborough, which is where the RSA Citizen Power project is located.
Wandering Through the Future (installation) by Marjolijn Dijkman, 2007. Commissioned by Sharjah Biennial 8: ‘STILL LIFE, Art, Ecology and the politics of Change’. Photo by Lateefa Maktoum

Go to RSA Arts & Ecology

ashdenizen: when science meets art … successfully

Kellie Payne has attended numerous ‘art and science’ events, but in this guest blog she argues that last weekend’s day-long symposiumRising To The Climate Challenge: Artists and Scientists Imagine Tomorrow’s World was particularly successful.

The Tate had paired with the Royal Society to present an impressive line-up of speakers, including artists Lucy Orta, Tomás Saraceno and the eminent land artist Agnes Denes. But its success could be attributed to another reason.

Kellie Payne writes:

Rather than framing the question as: ‘how can artists help scientists communicate climate change?’, last Saturday’s symposium Rising To The Climate Challenge took the view that art and science had two very different perspectives to offer and much could come from their collaborations. Art’s role isn’t simply to reformulate and appealingly package the scientific messages; instead it has a more fundamental exploratory and imaginative role. 

The climate science programme largely reflected the Royal Society’s priorities and included, along with the expected division of adaptation and mitigation a third one, geo-engineering. However, oceanographer and earth scientist Corinne Le Quéré , who introduced the topic, revealed that she was stuck with presenting it because none of the other speakers wanted it. Professor Le Quéré gave a well-balanced presentation comparing the various options’ effectiveness (predicted ˚C temperature change) versus the level of risk.

With more controversial options such as the frightening volcanic method, where artificial volcanoes are created in the atmosphere to reflect and reduce solar radiation, she demonstrated that even this was only a temporary fix. The volcanoes would need to continually be created because as soon as they ceased, CO2 levels in the atmosphere would rapidly return to pre-volcanic levels. A less risky option, managing earth radiation through afforestation was shown to be less effective, with a possible decrease in warming projected at only 1˚C.

Agnes Denes’ land art was incorporated into the topic of geo-engineering because her large-scale works often drastically alter the landscape. In Finland she created Tree Mountain- A Living Time Capsule, building a conical mountain and planting it with 11,000 trees, and planting and harvesting a wheat field in central Manhattan (Wheatfield: A Confrontation). During her slide show, Denes explained that she likes to investigate the paradoxes of human existence: logic, evolution, time, sound, etc. and believes that by shaping and structuring the future we can control our own evolution.

Tomás Saraceno presented with an infectious energy, bursting with novel, if impractical ideas that included his floating ecosystems.  Saraceno makes bold and imaginative attempts to stretch the boundaries of our conceptions of space and gravity with his experimental floating pods. His presentation was paired nicely with Oxford social scientist Steve Rayner’s on adaptation. He focused on cities of the future and the importance of instituting greater flexibility within existing infrastructures in order to cope with future climate events such as extreme flooding. He admires Saraceno’s work, in particular his innovation with new materials, shapes, and possibilities of new patterns of organisation.

Rayner highlighted three typical art/science interactions. The first was demonstrated by a photograph of a diseased liver cell and represented the mode of seeing beauty in the scientific. The second was art’s influence on science (mainly through science fiction such as HG Wells and Jules Verne), the model of artists stimulating scientists with their work leading to new ideas and discourses. The third – which Rayner thought the most compelling – were the interactions between scientists and artists that occur when artists ‘do science through art’. Essentially, where the borders between the two are eliminated and artists employ scientific methodology in their creations, as demonstrated in Saraceno’s work.

The collaboration between scientific institutions and artists was illustrated in a discussion between the Natural History Museum’sRobert Bloomfield and artist Lucy Orta , whose upcoming exhibition at the Jerwood Gallery Perpetual Amazonia is extensively researched using the NHM’s entomology, botany and palaeontology collections. The exhibition will also be informed by Lucy and her partner Jorge’s expedition to the Peru with Cape Farewell in 2009.  Bloomfield specialises in biodiversity and stressed the importance of the interrelations between climate change and biodiversity loss and ecosystem services.

The event was recorded. Podcasts will be available soon on the Tate website.

via ashdenizen: when science meets art … successfully.